Course of Study 2020-21

GENERAL INFORMATION

 

GENERAL INFORMATION

We, the staff of Irvine High School, believe that daily attendance is a vital component of classroom success.

Further, we believe that if students commit themselves to complete quality work, both in and outside of class, they will be successful in high school and beyond.

Lastly, we believe that if students become involved in activities on campus, they will have a more rewarding, more memorable high school experience.

WORK HABITS

Attendance in classes and work completion are critical to student success. This includes on-task behavior in the classroom, timely completion of assignments, positive contributions during class discussions, and preparing for exams. These behaviors can be facilitated by asking questions and by seeking assistance from parents/guardians, teachers, and tutors. Students who are engaged are students who learn.

INVOLVEMENT

The opportunities for student involvement at IHS are myriad and diverse. Students may become involved in our award- winning performing arts, visual arts, and technology programs. From Marching Band and Jazz Ensemble to Drama and Computer Graphics, there is something for everyone at IHS. Students may serve as ASB or class officers, as staff members of the award winning publications—El Vaquero, the student newspaper or the yearbook, The Citadel. Over 50 clubs exist on campus and new clubs are started each year as student interests change and new leaders emerge. Many of these clubs engage in community service activities, offering opportunities for students to serve others.  Involvement in activities fosters acquisition of group interaction skills (including how to be part of a team and how to work cooperatively), time management, organizational, and leadership skills. Above all, being part of something at school generates commitment to school and commitment to learning, which leads to a richer, more rewarding high school experience.

COMMUNITY SERVICE

Although community service is not a requirement for an IUSD diploma, many IHS students participate in a wide range of volunteer service.  Community service is an activity which demonstrates how a student is enhancing themselves and others throughout the high school years.  The recommended practice for students participating in community service is to

maintain a record of these activities.  For each school year during which 25 or more hours of community service are completed and documented, a notation will be indicated on the high school transcript.  

(COMMUNITY SERVICE Continued) A Community Service Form with instructions for completion is available on-line at www.irvinehigh.iusd.org.  Community service is often required and favorably viewed for scholarship consideration and on college applications.

THE ADVISEMENT PROGRAM

The Teacher Advisement Program (TA) provides an invaluable service to students, parents/guardians, and staff. It fosters communication and cooperation between and among all of these groups. Advisors have approximately 25-30 students of the same grade level whom they help guide through their high school years. Students are required to meet with their advisor three times each week. This contact promotes the exchange of important grade level and school-wide information and furthers the development of the relationship between advisor and student. In addition, advisor-student-parent/guardian course enrollment conferences are held annually in the spring.

The Teacher Advisor and the School Counselor are the crucial links between the students’ needs, abilities, and interests, and the vast array of educational opportunities and choices offered at IHS.  For more information about the advisement program, please see the school’s TA brochure or refer to our website. 

LINK CREW

Link Crew is a transition program to assist new students and freshmen to acclimate to the Irvine High School culture.  Link Crew is a student mentor program, run by students for students.  Irvine prides itself on the demonstration of values – IHS (Integrity, Honor, and Social Responsibility).  Growing from that philosophy, Irvine High School strives to provide new students with the social and academic support and guidance they need to be successful at school.

 

PERSONALIZED PROGRAMS

Irvine High School has made a commitment to provide learning programs that meet the individual needs and interests of each student. We currently offer the following programs in addition to a comprehensive education curriculum:

ENGLISH LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT & NEWCOMERS PROGRAM — The ELD Program provides basic skills courses that develop oral language, written communication, and reading for English Language learners.

READING — Irvine High School is committed to improve reading skills by offering specialized English Essential Courses.

SPECIAL EDUCATION — The Special Education Program assists students with exceptional academic needs. Placement of students in the Resource Specialist Program, Special Day Program, or Speech/Language Program is done only after careful examination of skills, abilities and needs.

LIFE CENTER

The LIFE Center (Looking Into Future Experiences) provides students and parents/guardians with an array of resources for post high school planning. Students are encouraged to involve themselves in the following LIFE Center activities, so they will be better prepared to make career, college, and/or university choices.

  1.  Enroll in Coastline Regional Occupational Program courses
  2. Use the literature in the LIFE Center to explore career clusters of jobs that align with personal interests/ talents
  3. Listen to career speakers
  4. Attend presentations by community college and  university admissions representatives
  5. Utilize college information to explore college options
  6. Utilize the Naviance software to explore college and career options

Students must anticipate a world of rapid change. Research indicates that future members of the workforce will have to communicate effectively and process ever-increasing amounts of information. To be prepared for the job market, students should take classes that extend their basic skills and explore real life experiences. Students should select classes that help to accomplish the following goals:

  1. Master basic competencies in reading, writing, and math
  2. Explore personal interests in academic areas as well as the fine arts, business, and the technical education fields
  3. Participate in school-sponsored career exploration experiences and internship training programs

COURSE SELECTION

IHS offers a broad and comprehensive selection of classes. Within the curriculum, there are many academically challenging classes that help to prepare students for the rigorous demands of college. There are also courses that enable students to pursue areas of self-interest and/or vocational training. Given the complexity of the curriculum, it is important that each student develop, in concert with his/her parents/guardians, Advisor, and Counselor, a long-range educational plan. Students, along with parents/guardians and Teacher Advisors, should choose classes carefully as adjustments after the fact are difficult.

Enrollment in classes will be decided on a seniority basis with seniors receiving first priority.  Classes that are limited in availability, and have a surplus of students requesting the classes, will be filled using a waitlist.

SCHEDULE ADJUSTMENTS

The faculty, staff, and administration encourage students to request courses carefully each spring based on needs and interests. Each semester, students are afforded the opportunity to request schedule adjustments with their Counselors. However, preference changes are not considered.  Preference changes are defined as follows:

  • A request to change from one teacher to another or 
  • A request to change from one period to another or 
  • A request for a specific open period (Jobs, internships, family commitments, and other non-school related commitments must be scheduled outside of the 8:00 AM to 3:25 PM school day)

LEVEL OF DIFFICULTY

This rating is designed to help in the selection of appropriate courses.

CP

College Preparatory

D

Difficult

NC

Non-college approved

M

Moderate

R

Most Rigorous

(Honors or AP)

T

Technical

GRADING POLICY

 

Students will be evaluated on their performance and mastery of subject matter each SEMESTER (18 weeks). The grades to be awarded shall be:

 

        A        = Superior Progress           A = 4 grade points

        B        = Above Average Progress   B = 3 grade points

        C        = Average Progress           C = 2 grade points

        D        = Below Average Progress  D = 1 grade point

        F        = Inadequate Progress          F  = 0 grade points

 

All semester grades become part of the student’s official transcript.  Mid-semester grade reports will be available to parents/guardians online at the end of the ninth week of each semester. These grades will not appear on a student’s official transcript; unless the class is a quarter class.

WEIGHTED GRADES

Advanced Placement courses and selected Honors/Enhanced courses, completed with a grade of C or better, shall receive a weighted grade point.  These designated courses are underlined on the IHS University of California a-g Course List.

Advanced Placement courses, completed with a grade of C or better, taken at any accredited high school, shall receive a weighted grade point.

Honors courses, completed with a grade of C or better, taken at any accredited California high school, shall receive a weighted grade ONLY if:

  • An identical course, designated as weighted on the IHS University of California a-g Course List, is offered at IHS AND
  • The course is identified on the prior school’s University of California a-g course list as a weighted course

 Weighted grade points shall be issued as follows:

 

A = 5         B = 4

C = 3    D = 1    

CREDIT POLICY

Irvine High School grants credit when a grade of “A” through “D” has been awarded. A grade of “F” earns no credit. Five credits shall be granted for all non-variable, alternating block semester-long courses. Ten credits shall be awarded for all non-variable solid block semester-long courses.  Courses offered during zero period earn 5 credits per semester except Marching Band and Jazz Ensemble. Variable credit courses allow students to earn credit upon the completion of specific measurable course objectives. (Courses offering variable credit are noted in the course descriptions.)

REPEATING A COURSE

Students may repeat an academic course to improve their understanding of course content or to improve their grade. Students repeating a course do so with the understanding that:

  1. Transcripts will reflect both grades.
  2. Double credit IS NOT issued for a previously passed academic course.
  3. If a “C” or better is earned in an academic course, and a student chooses to repeat the course, both grades will be calculated into the GPA.

INCOMPLETE GRADE (I)

A grade of Incomplete is given by a teacher only in rare situations, generally due to illness or a reason beyond the student’s control.  The student must complete the course work by the end of the next quarter after the Incomplete is issued.  If the course work is not completed in the allotted time, the Incomplete is converted to a failing grade (F).  At the time the course work is completed, the student/parent should request a Grade or Credit Change from the teacher who will inform the record’s clerk so the transcript is accurate.

ACADEMIC RECOGNITION

Irvine High School students with an academic, weighted GPA of 3.500 or higher are recognized with the Principal’s Honor Roll each semester based on GPA for the previous semester coursework.

Graduating seniors are recognized at the Senior Awards Assembly for High and Highest Honors.  The High and Highest Honors are determined by academic, weighted GPA after seven semesters (end of fall semester of 12th grade) of high school.  Highest Honors is 4.000 or higher and High Honors is 3.8000 to 3.9999 GPA.  Students with High Honors are presented an Honors braid and Highest Honors are presented an Honors stole to wear at graduation. GPA’s are taken as is, and are not rounded up.

 

INTERNATIONAL TRANSCRIPTS

Students transferring from a high school out of the United States will receive a Pass or No Credit for coursework completed at the student’s out of country school.  Coursework taken at WASC accredited schools or equivalent will be awarded letter grades (A, B, C, D, F).

 

CONCURRENT INSTRUCTION AND COLLEGE CREDIT

Concurrent instruction is defined to include any educational experience occurring outside the auspices of the Irvine Unified School District. Concurrent instruction includes college coursework, private instruction, and independent study. Students must request prior approval for concurrent instruction from their IHS Counselor and their grade-level administrator.

For credits earned through concurrent instruction, no weighted grade point shall be awarded, nor shall any Honors or Advanced Placement designations be made on the official transcript.

Students who earn college credit may elect to have that credit used towards their IHS diploma if the course or credits are needed to fulfill graduation or minimum college preparatory requirements.  Community College credit shall be posted to the IHS transcript as follows:

        College Semester Units

IHS Credits

2.5 or 5

5

2

4

1.5

3

1

2

.5

1

*Enrollment in physical education or health is not available through the community college.

**Private instruction for world language is limited to 10 credits and independent study is limited to 20 credits. All are taken on a pass-no pass basis.

 

CREDIT FOR PRIVATE INSTRUCTION

Credit for private instruction will be available in the area of Physical Education and World Language.  This credit must be approved in advance from an administrator.  Options are limited and must meet rigorous district guidelines.  

 

Physical Education Private Instruction

 

Private instruction in Physical Education is designed for students who are nationally ranked in an individual sport or are in a sport pre-approved for private instruction credit by the Irvine Unified School District.  The student must be preparing for national/international competition and have at least 300 minutes per week of private instruction/practice with a qualified instructor.  The maximum number of physical education credits available via private instruction is 20 on a pass/fail basis only.

 

Parents/guardians and students must submit an application within the first two weeks of each semester to be considered for Private Instruction P.E.  Applications may be obtained from the student’s Counselor or administrator.  Students must reapply each semester.  Applications must include a copy of the student’s ranking, the student’s practice schedule, and a schedule of the student’s contests/competitions/games.

 

World Language Private Instruction

Elective credit shall be awarded based on the time spent in class.  Pass/Fail grades will be awarded.  The program of instruction must be on the approved IUSD list of world language programs.  A maximum of 10 credits may be earned in this manner.  Prior approval from an assistant principal is required.  Students must reapply each semester.  

 

Appropriate transcript entries shall be made.  However, the course title used shall not appear on the University of California approved course list.  Forms are available from the registrar.  The   maximum   number of credits available is ‘10’.

MENTAL HEALTH/WELLNESS SERVICES AND RESOURCES

The District provides school-based mental health/ wellness services and resources (www.iusd.org/WeCare or https://iusd.org/department/mental-health-wellness  to students and families. These services include short-term individual or group counseling for students at the school site; short-term, solution-focused therapy for students and families through the Irvine Family Resource Center; and resource linkages to community-based mental health or social services for students and families. Services are provided by counselors or licensed mental health professionals.

Minimum Graduation Requirements

UNIVERSITY APPROVED COLLEGE PREPARATORY COURSES 2019-2020

The current UC approved course list may be accessed by going to Irvine High School UC Approved List.  The following Irvine High School courses approved to satisfy the CSU and UC “A – G” requirements.  Underlined courses with grades of “C” or better only will receive a weighted grade point.  

HISTORY/SOCIAL SCIENCE (meets “A” requirement)

American Government (AP)

European History (AP)

Political Economy

U.S. History

U.S. History (AP)

Modern World History

Modern World History (H)

ENGLISH (meets “B” requirement)

English 1

English 2

English 3

English 4

American Literature (H)

British Literature (H)

Creative Writing

English Language Development 3B

English Language/Composition (AP)

English Literature/Composition (AP)

Mythology

 

MATHEMATICS (meets “C” requirement)

*Math I C/D

*Math I

*Math II

*Enhanced Math II

*Math III

*Enhanced Math III

*Math IV

Statistics (AP)

Calculus AB (AP)

Calculus BC (AP)

*cannot be used to satisfy the “G” Requirement

 

LABORATORY SCIENCE (meets “D” requirement)

Biology (CP, H & SH)

Biology (AP)

Chemistry   (CP, H & SH)

Chemistry (AP)

Anatomy and Physiology

Physics  

Physics (AP)

Environmental Science (AP)

 

LANGUAGE other than English (meets “E” requirement)

*French 1          *Korean 1        *Spanish 1                

French 2             Korean 2         Spanish 2                

French 3             Korean 3         Spanish 3 

French 4 (H)      Korean 4 (H)   Spanish 4 (H)         

French (AP)                               Spanish  (AP)           

*cannot be used to satisfy the “G” Requirement

~denotes that this course is pending approval by UC

VISUAL/PERFORMING ARTS (meets “F” requirement)

*Ceramics          Dance Tech 2

  Advanced Ceramics          Dance Tech 3

*Intro to Art          Dance Tech 4

*Painting and Drawing          Dance Ensemble

  Adv. Painting and Drawing        *Creative Drama

*Visual Imagery (Photo)          Intermediate Drama

  Adv. Visual Imagery (Photo)          Advanced Drama

  Animation (Beg & Adv)          Tech Theater

*Computer Graphics        *Guitar 1

  Adv. Computer Graphics            Guitar 2

  Video Production        *Piano

  Advanced Video Production         *Percussion Ensemble

  Art of Film           Jazz Ensemble 1

  Intro to Photo Journalism          *Jazz Ensemble 2

  Art History (AP)          Wind Symphony

  Studio Art:  Drawing (AP)        *Concert Band

  Studio Art:2D Design (AP)        *Concert Orchestra

  Studio Art: 3D Design (AP)          Philharmonic Orchestra

  Music Theory (AP)         Symphonic Orchestra

  *Treble Chorus         Symphonic Band

  *Bass Chorus           Irvine Singers

  Canta Bella         Chorale

        *cannot be used to satisfy the “G” Requirement        

¹Students satisfy the VPA requirement by completing two courses of an approved “F” course in either Visual or Performing Arts.

      

COLLEGE PREP ELECTIVES (Meets “G” requirement)  All courses listed in sections A-F above with the exception of those marked with an * plus the following:

ENGLISH

Beginning Journalism (1 semester allowed)

Advanced Journalism (1 semester allowed)

SOCIAL SCIENCE

Psychology

Macroeconomics (AP)

ELECTIVES

Yearbook

Automotive Technology MLR 1 and 2

Automotive Engineering- Adv. Auto

Virtual Enterprise

Introduction to Engineering and Design

Principles of Engineering

Aerospace Engineering

Engineering Design and Development

Exploring Computer Science

Computer Science (AP)

Beg Web Design

 

 

 

 

 

SUMMARY OF CIF/IUSD ELIGIBILITY RULES

FOR ATHLETICS & ACTIVITIES ACCORDING TO BOARD OF EDUCATION POLICY #6145(A)        

In order to be eligible, a student must:

1.        Be currently enrolled in a minimum of 25 credits of coursework.

2.        Have passed a minimum of 20 credits of coursework from the previous Quarter. (Only 5 credits from the student's sport/activity and physical education classes can be used towards the counting of the 20 credits)

3.        Have a GPA of 2.0 or higher from the previous quarter.

PROBATION:

A student is allowed a one-time, one-quarter probation period that they may use once during their 4 years of eligibility in

High School when the student's GPA falls below the 2.0 minimum.   Students who have not passed a minimum of 20 s from the  previous quarter are ineligible and may not use a waiver.

WHAT DOES IT MEAN TO BE INELIGIBLE?

When ineligible, a student may not participate in the extra-curricular activity in question. Athletes, class representatives, pep squad, color guard, ASB members, etc. may not  participate in rallies or any other school activity outside of the classroom. Students must still attend class and/or  practices and meetings and do any/all required assignments in order to receive credit.

When in doubt, the coach/advisor must see the Assistant Principal in charge of Athletic Eligibility for clarification.

 

Eligibility requirements apply to the following students:

                • All Athletes                • Color Guard                • ASB & Class Officers                • Dance Ensemble

                • Pep Squad                • Marching Band        • Drama Production                • Choir

       All others deemed necessary by the school administration.

NATIONAL COLLEGIATE ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS

Student athletes desiring to compete in athletics at a Division I or Division II college/university must be certified eligible by the NCAA Eligibility Center.

To be certified a student must: Graduate from high school and Meet a minimum GPA in 16 core courses with a  corresponding ACT sum or SAT total score. 

See your coach or Counselor for details.  The courses on the UC Course List may be used to satisfy core requirements. You may check the NCAA rules, regulations, and approved courses at the following link:  http://eligibilitycenter.org/ECNR2/NCAA_EMS/NCAA.html

Click on the “list of approved courses list” and use the following ETS code: 051271.

Core Courses

  • NCAA Divisions I and II require 16 core courses. See the charts below.
  • Beginning August 1, 2016, NCAA Division I will require 10 core courses to be completed prior to the seventh semester (seven of the 10 must be a combination of English, math or natural or physical science that meet the distribution requirements below). These 10 courses become “locked in” at the start of the seventh semester and cannot be retaken for grade improvement. Beginning August 1, 2016, it will be possible for a Division I college-bound student-athlete to still receive athletics aid and the ability to practice with the team if he or she fails to meet the 10 course requirement, but would not be able to compete.

Test Scores

  • Division I uses a sliding scale to match test scores and core grade-point averages (GPA).
  • Division II requires a minimum SAT score of 820 or an ACT sum score of 68.
  • The SAT score used for NCAA purposes includes only the critical reading and math sections. The writing section of the SAT is not used.
  • The ACT score used for NCAA purposes is a sum of the following four sections: English, mathematics, reading and science.
  • When you register for the SAT or ACT, use the NCAA Eligibility Center code of 9999 to ensure all SAT and ACT scores are reported directly to the NCAA Eligibility Center from the testing agency. Test scores that appear on transcripts will not be used.

Grade-Point Average

  • Be sure to look at your high school’s List of NCAA Courses on the NCAA Eligibility Center’s website (https://web3.ncaa.org/ecwr3/). Only courses that appear on your school’s List of NCAA Courses will be used in the calculation of the core GPA. Use the list as a guide.
  • Division I GPA required to receive athletics aid and practice on or after August 1, 2016, is 2.000-2.299.
  • Division I GPA required to be eligible for competition on or after August 1, 2016, is 2.300 .
  • The Division II core GPA requirement is a minimum of 2.000.
  • Remember, the NCAA GPA is calculated using NCAA core courses only.

IRVINE HIGH SCHOOL NCAA APPROVED COURSES

ENGLISH

SOCIAL SCIENCE

MATHEMATICS

NATURAL/PHYSICAL SCIENCE

ADDITIONAL COURSES

American Lit. H

American Lit.

Beg Journalism

British Lit. H

British Lit.

Creative Writing

English 1

English 2

English 3

English 4

Eng. Comp. & Lit

Eng. Lang AP

English Lit AP

Journalism Adv.

Mythology

World Lit.

American Gov. AP

European Hist. AP

Global Studies

M World Hist.

M World History SH

M World Hist. H

Political Econ. SH

Political Econ

Psychology

US History

US History SH

US History AP

Macroeconomics AP

 

Math I

Math II

Enhanced Math II

Math III

Enhanced Math III

Math IV

Algebra 1

Algebra 1 CD (.5 units)

Algebra 2

H Algebra 2/Trig

Algebra 1A (.5 units)

Algebra 1B (.5 units)

Geometry

Geometry H

Pre-Calculus

Pre-Calculus H

Statistics AP

Calculus AB AP

Calculus BC AP

 

Adv. Pre-Med 1

Adv. Pre-Med 2

Biology

Next Gen Biology

Next Gen Biology H

Biology AP

Chemistry

Next Gen Chemistry

Next Gen Chem. H

Chemistry AP

Environmental Sci. AP Geophysical Sci.

Anat. & Physiology

Physics

Physics L/AP

 

Comp. Religions H

French 1

French 2

French 3

French 4 H

French AP

Korean 1

Korean 2

Korean 3

Korean 4

Korean 5 H

Spanish 1

Spanish 2

Spanish 3

Spanish 4 H

Spanish AP

Spanish for Native Speakers

 

UC and CSU A-G Subject Eligibility Requirements

All students are required to complete the following requirements with a “C” or higher in order to be UC or CSU eligible.

Subject Area

California State University

University of California

GPA

Calculate your high school GPA using only “a-g” approved courses taken after 9th grade

Subject Requirements

15 year-long college prep courses from approved “a-g” course list

Honors Points

Maximum of 8 extra points awarded for approved honors, AP or IB courses and transferable community college courses.  No more than two year- long courses taken in 10th grade can earn honors points

A-G Subject Requirements

CSU

UC

“A” Social Sciences & History

2 Years Required

1 year US History, or 1 semester US History and 1 semester Civics or American Government

1 Year Social Studies

2 Years Required

1 year US History, or 1 semester US History and 1 semester Civics or American Government

1 Year World History

“B” English

4 Years Required

No more than 1 year may be Advanced ELD

4 Years Required

No more than 1 year may be Advanced ELD

“C” Mathematics

3 Years Required

Math I, Math II, Math III

3 Years Required

4th Year Strongly Recommended

Math I, Math II, Math III

“D” Laboratory Science

2 Years Required

1 Year Physical Science (may be Geophysical Science)

1 Year Biological Science

2 Years Required

3 Years Strongly Recommended

1 Year Biological

1 Year Chemistry or Physics

“E” Language Other than English (LOTE)

2 Years Required

Must be one language

2 Years Required

3 Years Strongly Recommended

Must be one language

“F” Visual and Performing Arts (VAPA)

1 Year Required

2 courses in either Visual or Perf. Arts

(Example: Ceramics F & Intro to Art S)

1 Year Required

2 semesters of the same discipline (Visual or Performing Arts)

“G” College Preparatory Elective

1 Year Required

One (or 2 semesters) in addition to those listed above in A-F or Non-Introductory VPA or Year 3 of LOTE or 2 years of a second LOTE

1 Year Required

One (or 2 semesters) in addition to those listed above in A-F or Non-Introductory VPA or Year 3 of LOTE or 2 years of a second LOTE

 

 

POTENTIAL UNIVERSITIES AND COMMUNITY COLLEGES

 

UC Schools

CSU Schools

Community Colleges

Berkeley

Davis

Irvine

Los Angeles

Merced

Riverside

San Diego

Santa Barbara

Santa Cruz

Bakersfield

Channel Islands

Chico

Dominquez Hills

Fresno

Fullerton

East Bay

Humboldt

Long Beach

Los Angeles Northridge

Maritime Acd. Monterey Bay

Pomona

Sacramento

San Bernardino

San Diego

San Francisco

San Jose

San Luis Obispo

San Marcos

Sonoma

Stanislaus

Cypress College

Fullerton College

Golden West College

Irvine Valley

Orange Coast

Santa Ana Community College

Santiago Canyon College

Coastline College

Saddleback College

POST-SECONDARY ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS

University of California: Entrance Requirements (http://admission.universityofcalifornia.edu)  

         All freshmen applicants must satisfy subject, testing and scholarship requirements

         Requires a minimum GPA of 3.0 in the a-g coursework

         All coursework must be passed with a “C” or better

 UC Testing Requirements:  Each applicant must submit scores on an approved core test of mathematics, language arts and writing.  This requirement can be satisfied by taking either:

                 The ACT Assessment plus the new ACT Writing Test (www.act.org) or

                 The SAT Reasoning Test (evidence-based reading, mathematics with writing) (www.collegeboard.com)

Two SAT Subject Exams are no longer required for admission.  However, students may choose to submit their scores for consideration as part of their application.  The subject exams may be recommended for certain majors.  All applicants will need to complete 11 of the 15 “a-g” courses by the end of their junior year.

California State University: Entrance Requirements  

         All freshmen applicants must satisfy subject, testing and scholarship requirements.  Students must also meet a

 qualifying eligibility index

         Requires a minimum GPA of 2.0

         All coursework must be passed with a “C” or better

 CSU Testing Requirements: Each applicant must submit scores on an approved core test of mathematics and language arts.  This requirement can be satisfied by taking either:

                 The ACT Assessment (www.act.org) or

                 The SAT Reasoning Test (evidence-based reading, mathematics with writing ) (www.collegeboard.com)        

                        *Scores from the writing section will not be used for admission purposes to CSU.

CSU Eligibility Index: If your grade point average in CSU approved courses is above a 3.0 and you have taken the SAT or the ACT Assessment, you have met minimum entrance requirements.  IF your GPA is below 3.0 and above 2.0 your SAT or ACT scores will determine your eligibility.  Many CSU campuses set the minimum eligibility higher for students who live outside their attendance area.  The CSU eligibility index can be located at: https://www2.calstate.edu/apply

 California Community College: Entrance Requirements: www.cccco.edu 

All graduates from Irvine High School are eligible to attend any California Community College regardless of courses pursued in high school.  Students over 18 may enroll without a high school diploma.

Students at a community college may work toward training and certification in a variety of occupation related areas or pursue coursework leading toward transfer to a four-year university.

To enroll at a Community College students must:

  1. Apply to the college online
  2. Apply for financial aid (recommended)
  3. Complete orientation and placement workshop
  4. Complete advisement and develop a first semester plan
  5. Register for classes

Students planning to attend community college are encouraged to begin the application process early in order to maximize their opportunities for course selection. 

COLLEGE BOARD TESTING (www.collegeboard.com)

The PSAT is the official abbreviated version of the SAT Reasoning Test.  The PSAT is offered during the fall semester and is suggested for junior class standing; however, may be taken during the sophomore year as well.  The PSAT is not used in college admissions decisions.  This test is used to qualify students for the National Merit Scholarship, if taken during the fall of the junior year. 

The SAT Reasoning Test is typically taken by high school juniors and seniors.  It tells students how well they use the skills and knowledge they have attained in and outside of the classroom including how they think, solve problems, and communicate.

The SAT Subjects Tests are designed to measure knowledge, skills and application in specific subjects such as literature, history, math, science and language other than English.  SAT Subject Exams are no longer required for admission.  However, students may choose to submit their scores for consideration as part of their application, just as they do now with AP scores to CSU or UC. However, Subject Exams may be recommended for certain majors.  Consult the web sites or admissions offices of other colleges you are considering applying to verify which SAT Tests are required.

AMERICAN COLLEGE TESTING (www.act.org)

The ACT is divided into four required sections:  English (punctuation, grammar and usage, sentence structure and rhetorical skills), mathematics (skills typically acquired in courses through the end of the 11th grade), reading comprehension and science (interpretation, analysis, evaluation, reasoning and problem-solving skills required in general or introductory science courses).  The optional Writing Test measures skills in high school English classes and entry-level college composition courses.

The UC System requires the ACT or the SAT plus the Writing Test.  The CSU System does not require scores from the Writing Test for admission.

SUGGESTED SAT EXAM TIMELINE

SUGGESTED ACT EXAM TIMELINE

PSAT

Junior class standing; may be taken as sophomore

SAT Reasoning Test

Spring of junior year

Repeat (as needed or desired) fall of senior year

ACT

Spring of junior year

Repeat (as needed or desired) fall of senior year

SAT Subject Tests

Spring of junior year

Exception:  after specific subject completion such as AP European History or pre-calculus

 

For SAT test dates and registration deadlines, go to: www.collegeboard.com

For ACT test dates and registration deadlines, go to:  www.act.org

ADDITIONAL NOTES ON COLLEGE ENTRANCE EXAMS

Nearly all colleges and universities in the United States accept either the SAT or ACT scores when considering college admissions decision.  Entrance exam scores are one of several factors considered in college admissions decisions.   Colleges set their own policies regarding which scores they want students to send and which scores they review.  Check with the admissions offices of the colleges to which you are considering submitting an application.

When reporting ACT scores to colleges, you can choose which ACT score to release.  You may select the  optional score reporting feature which will allow you to choose one, multiple or all SAT test scores on a single score report.  If this option is not selected, all SAT scores will be sent as has been traditional practice.

 

Course Offerings

English

English Pathways

English Flow Chart

 


ENGLISH ESSENTIALS I A/B

Recommended Placement: Reading two or more levels below grade, standardized test scores, & 8th grade Teacher Rec.
Credit: 20
Format: 1 year solid block
Level of Difficulty: NC

This course reviews and reinforces basic skills in reading and writing.  It is recommended for students needing assistance in mastering high school graduation competencies in reading and writing.   Activities in vocabulary development, usage, mechanics, reading comprehension, sentence structure, and paragraph development are emphasized.  The objective of this course is to equip students with the following skills:

  • Determining word meaning from context.
  • Distinguishing between literal and figurative meaning.
  • Distinguishing between main idea and supporting ideas.
  • Discerning the author's purpose.
  • Writing summaries of written information.
  • Analyzing and evaluating literature.
  • Writing a paragraph using a topic sentence which is supported and developed by the other sentences in a paragraph.
  • Using and improving the methods of single paragraph development in the composition of multi-paragraph essays.
  • Developing research skills integrating technology.
  • Applying rules of standard English.

 


ENGLISH ESSENTIALS II A/B

Recommended Placement:  Standardized test scores & Teacher Rec.
Credit: 10
Format: 1 year alternating block
Level of Difficulty:  NC

This course focuses on basic English skills and is recommended for students needing assistance in reading and writing.   Activities in vocabulary development, usage, mechanics, reading comprehension, sentence structure, and paragraph development are stressed.  The objective of this course is to equip students with the following skills:

  • Expanding vocabulary.
  • Distinguishing between connotative and denotative meaning.
  • Acquiring and implementing test taking strategies.
  • Articulating responses to literature using critical thinking skills.
  • Identifying different types of writing based on the author's purpose.
  • Implementing the stages of the writing process
  • Writing multi-paragraph essays.
  • Completing job applications.
  • Expanding and developing research skills integrating technology.

   


ENGLISH 1

Recommended Placement: 9th - Standardized test scores & 8th grade Teacher Rec.    10-12th – Teacher Rec.
Credit: 10     
Format: 1 semester solid block
Level of Difficulty: CP      

Students must pass English 1 with a 70% or above in order to enroll in English 2.

This course is designed to be a comprehensive review of all English skills with a specific emphasis on writing skills and literature interpretation. Special attention will be given to reading skills necessary to gather information, understand critical purpose and gain enjoyment and appreciation of literature. The course will emphasize the same basic skills tested in most standardized tests of basic skill. Therefore, vocabulary will be a major part of the course. Language usage and sentence mechanics will also receive attention. Since writing is the most sophisticated communication skill, great emphasis will be placed on composition and fluency of writing. Upon completion of the course, the student will be able to:

Writing:

  1. Write a paragraph using a topic sentence that is supported and developed by the other sentences in the paragraph.
  2. Use and improve the methods of single paragraph development in the composition of multi-paragraph essays.
  3. Write effective and concise business letters.
  4. Effectively apply the writing process to their essays.
  5. Write an expository paragraph of not less than five sentences with supporting detail developing a single idea.
  6. Write complete sentences.
  7. Use correct end and internal punctuation.
  8. Use a variety of sentence types: compound, complex, compound-complex sentences.
  9. Write for a variety of audiences and purposes using different modes of writing: descriptive/ sensory, narrative, expository/analytical, etc.

Literature:

  1. Classify a literary work by genre.
  2. Interpret cultural attitudes and customs other than his own through a reading of literature.
  3. Respond to information explicitly stated in the text (literal).
  4. Respond with ideas or opinions based on material read but not stated explicitly in the text (interpretive).
  5. Investigate, evaluate, and integrate the information and ideas with one's own experience and/or apply it in a new context (critical).
  6. Analyze and evaluate short stories, poems, novels, drama, and essays as a reflection of life, values, and ideas of this and other cultures.
  7. Specific reading objectives:
    • Follow and interpret a sequence of ideas and events.
    • Identify the main idea and supporting details.
    • Re-interpret content in their own language and use context to understand meaning.
    • Apply knowledge gained through past experiences.
    • Draw conclusions and make judgments based on information received.
    • Identify the author's purpose, mood, tone, and theme.
    • Interpret figurative language.
    • Predict outcomes in terms of prior knowledge.
    • Distinguish between fact and opinion and recognize persuasive statements.
  8. Write critical evaluations of stories, poetry, articles, dramatic presentations, and novels.

Students who fail must repeat the course.  Summer school is recommended.

 


Honors English 1

Credit: 10     
Format: 1 semester solid block
Level of Difficulty: CP, R
This course is designed as a survey of American literature.  Strong emphasis is placed on various writing modes and in researching major writers’ contributions.  Students should be highly motivated.   Students are expected to respond to the various genres by demonstrating in-class discussions, oral presentations, and higher-level thinking skills.  Study skills will be emphasized.  A 70% or above is required to move on to Honors British Literature.  Upon completion of the course, a student will be able to:
Composition:

  1. Write a clear thesis statement.
  2. Employ improved vocabulary and conventions of Standard English regarding content and purpose, organization, unity and coherence in written work.
  3. Provide appropriate structure, tone, and point of view to various writing modes.
  4. Vary sentence structure and length.
  5. Provide transition between sentences and paragraphs in a logical functional style.
  6. Evaluate and score peer writing.
  7. Employ conventions of Standard English.
  8. Conduct research and formulate an argument based on evidence.
  9. Respond to on-demand writing prompts.
  10. Complete several process papers.

Reading:

  1. Utilize critical thinking to apply to literature.
  2. Analyze and evaluate selected literature as a reflection of customs, culture and values of particular groups or regions.
  3. Trace key social developments from the Puritan attitude through the modern themes of alienation as a reflection of change in lifestyle and literary trends.
  4. Recognize the interrelationship of various ideas expressed by authors studied and elaborate a subjective response through analysis and synthesis.
  5. Utilize the different points of view of literature as a means of looking at one’s own experience in a new light.
  6. Distinguish various literary styles and techniques.
  7. Identify figures of speech and devices of sound.
  8. Identify meter, verse forms, stanza forms and types of poems.
  9. Make connections between classic works of literature and non-fiction selections.

§ = Students are expected to spend additional hours beyond regular class time.

 


English 2

Recommended Placement: 70% or above in English, English Comp. & Lit, or equivalent CP course; sophomore standing or higher
Credit: 10     
Format: 1 semester solid block or 1 year alt. block
Level of Difficulty: CP

This course is designed to be a comprehensive review of basic skills along with emphasis in analysis of literature and writing. Speaking and listening skills will be emphasized along with vocabulary and language usage. Upon completion of the course, the student will be able to:

Writing:

  1. Write a paragraph which develops and supports the main idea with example or reasons.
  2. Organize paragraphs in a sequence that reflects relationship in a logical manner along with support of main idea.
  3. Use varied sentence types from the simple to compound complex which indicate relationships and importance of ideas.
  4. Write sentences with precise and appropriate words recognizing distinction between literal and figurative uses of languages and avoiding ineffective jargon and cliché.
  5. Develop an essay with introductory paragraph, body (at least three developing paragraphs), and a conclusion demonstrating appropriate use of evidence or personal conclusion.

Literature:

  1. Interpret cultural attitudes and customs other than one’s own through a reading of literature.
  2. Respond to information explicitly stated in the text (literal).
  3. Respond with ideas or opinions based on material read but not explicitly stated in the text (interpretive).
  4. Investigate, evaluate and integrate the information and ideas with one’s own experience and apply it in a new context (critical).
  5. Analyze and evaluate short stories, poems, novels, drama and essays as a reflective of life, values, and ideas of ours and other cultures.
  6. Develop an appreciation for literature as art.
  7. Write critical evaluations of all genres covered: essay, novel, poetry, short story and drama.
  8. Students who fail must repeat the course.  Summer school is recommended.

 


Honors English 2

Recommended Placement:  77% or higher in Honors American Literature, & Teacher Rec.  Students who did not complete Honors American Literature must meet the other criteria plus complete a timed writing sample to determine eligibility.
Credit:  10
Format: 1 semester solid block
Level of Difficulty:  CP, R

This course is designed for highly motivated, high achieving students.  It examines both the development of English literature and the English language from an historical perspective.   This literature based writing course will equip students with the critical thinking, reading and writing skills needed for the PSAT and AP Language and Composition.   Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:
Literature:

  1. Demonstrate an increased vocabulary derived from the literature
  2. Read for both literal and figurative meaning
  3. Evaluate the philosophical, political, religious, ethical, and social influences of the historical period that shaped the characters, plots, and settings.
  4. Analyze the rhetorical devices writers use to achieve their purpose
  5. Analyze the way in which the theme of a selection represents a view or comment on life, using evidence to support the claim.
  6. Contrast the major literary forms, techniques, and characteristics of the major literary periods
  7. Analyze characteristics of sub genres (e.g., satire, parody, allegory, pastoral) that are used in poetry, prose, plays, novels, short stories, essays and other basic genres

Writing:

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of the elements of discourse (e.g., purpose, speaker, audience, form) when completing narrative, expository, persuasive, or descriptive writing assignments.
  2. Write interpretive essays that demonstrate a close read of the text, a unifying purpose, and clarity of expression.
  3. Enhance meaning by employing various rhetorical strategies to develop their ideas such as comparison/contrast, cause and effect, examples, narration, description, and argumentation.
  4. Achieve a high interest level in their compositions by employing rhetorical devices such as parallelism, repetition, analogy, etc.
  5. Revise process papers to highlight the individual voice, improve sentence variety and style, and enhance subtlety of meaning and tone in ways that are consistent with purpose, audience, and genre.
  6. Prepare a multimedia presentation that demonstrates the use of  research and technology
  7. Employ the conventions of standard English

 


English 3

Recommended Placement:  70% or above in English 2, World Lit. & Comp or equivalent CP course; Jr./Sr. standing
Credit:  10
Format: 1 semester solid block
Level of Difficulty:  CP, D

This course is a survey of the development of the literature of the United States from its colonial beginnings to the present.  Through the study of central works in American Literature students gain an understanding of ethical, aesthetic and cultural values.  All genres in the various literary movements such as colonial rationalism, romanticism, transcendentalism, and realism are studied.  The course work will prepare students to read and think critically.  Compositions will reinforce the writing process and a heavy emphasis on critical analysis. The curriculum also prepares students for college entrance exams and requirements. Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:
Literature:

  1. Utilize improved vocabulary
  2. Read for both literal and figurative meaning.
  3. Evaluate the philosophical, political, religious, ethical, and social influences of the historical period that shaped the characters, plots, and settings.
  4. Analyze the rhetorical devices writers use to achieve their purpose.
  5. Analyze the way in which the theme of a selection represents a view or comment on life, using evidence to support the claim.
  6. Contrast the major literary forms, techniques, and characteristics of the major literary periods.
  7. Analyze characteristics of sub genres (e.g., satire, parody, allegory, and pastoral) that are used in poetry, prose, plays, novels, short stories, essays and other basic genres.

Writing:

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of the elements of discourse (e.g., purpose, speaker, audience, form) when completing narrative, expository, persuasive, or descriptive writing assignments.
  2. Write interpretive essays that demonstrate a close read of the text, a unifying purpose, and clarity of expression.
  3. Enhance meaning by employing various rhetorical strategies to develop their ideas such as comparison/contrast, cause and effect, examples, narration, description, and argumentation.
  4. Achieve a high interest level in their compositions by employing rhetorical devices such as parallelism, repetition, analogy, etc.
  5. Revise process papers to highlight the individual voice, improve sentence variety and style, and enhance subtlety of meaning and tone in ways that are consistent with purpose, audience, and genre.
  6. Write a saturation paper that reveals research with correct MLA style and utilizes the various rhetorical modes such as description, narration, exposition, and persuasion.
  7. Employ conventions of standard English.

  

MOVIES AND COMMENTARY

 

Jr./Sr. standing; priority given to seniors
Credit: 10    
Format: 1 semester solid block
Level of Difficulty: NC    

This course includes examination, criticism, and discussion of selected films.  Students will consider the correlation between literary elements and the screenplay. Through this process, students will be required to employ critical thinking skills in analyzing film as a social medium.  Assessment for the course will be based primarily on written essays and oral presentations.   Upon completion of the course, the student will be able to:

  1. Identify milestones in the development of film as a popular medium.
  2. Exhibit an understanding of screenplay structure and convention.
  3. Incorporate film terminology in both written and verbal analysis.
  4. Identify outstanding/honored films, actors and directors.  
  5. Recognize the use of literary techniques to achieve dramatic effects in film.
  6. Exhibit knowledge of film genres.
  7. Demonstrate an understanding of the manner in which film has reflected history, society and the human experience.

 


CREATIVE WRITING

Junior/Senior standing; priority given to seniors
Credit: 10  
Format: 1 semester solid block
Level of Difficulty: CP

This course introduces students to the fundamental conventions of poetry and fiction both as readers and as writers. Students write original poems, short fiction, and critically evaluate writing in a workshop atmosphere. To develop original writing pieces, students will engage in writing workshops, literary element development lessons, writing/author studies, and peer reviews/conferences. To show evidence of writing development throughout the course, students will be required to engage in writing community activities that require sharing one’s work and in publishing one’s writing beyond the classroom setting. Students will design, edit, and contribute writing pieces to Irvine High School’s literary magazine. The creative products will reflect a range of literary forms and show an understanding of genre, creative techniques, and grammar skills.

Upon completion of the course, the student will be able to:

  1. Complete prewriting activities to encourage creative thinking and to inspire writing projects.
  2. Analyze and critique writers’ use of literary elements, word choice, style, and content.
  3. Use class writing exercises to develop their ability to create characters, conflicts, settings, plots, themes, and points of view; to craft language to convey their ideas to refine their own writing style.
  4. Write original writing pieces inspired by literary models and examples.
  5. Make connections among literature, students’ lives, and real world issues.
  6. Complete writing projects, such as short fiction, a graphic novel, poetry collection, digital prose poem, one act play, film screenplay, and literary magazine.

 


English 4

Recommended Placement: 70% or above in English 3, Amer. Lit & Comp. or equivalent CP course; senior standing
Credit:  10
Format: 1 semester solid block
Level of Difficulty:  CP, D
This course surveys the development of literature and the English language from its Anglo-Saxon beginnings to the present.  Students will understand how the historical times influenced the writers by studying the literary movements and analyzing the different genres of each period.  This class equips students with the critical thinking, reading, and writing skills necessary for college.  Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:
Literature:

  1. Read for both literal and figurative meaning
  2. Evaluate the philosophical, political, religious, ethical, and social influences of the historical period that shaped the characters, plots, and settings.
  3. Analyze the rhetorical devices writers use to achieve their purpose
  4. Analyze the way in which the theme of a selection represents a view or comment on life, using
  5. evidence to support the claim.
  6. Contrast the major literary forms, techniques, and characteristics of the major literary periods
  7. Analyze characteristics of sub genres (e.g., satire, parody, allegory, pastoral) that are used in poetry, prose, plays, novels, short stories, essays and other basic genres

Writing:

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of the elements of discourse (e.g., purpose, speaker, audience, form) when completing narrative, expository, persuasive, or descriptive writing assignments.
  2. Write interpretive essays that demonstrate a close read of the text, a unifying purpose, and clarity of expression.
  3. Enhance meaning by employing various rhetorical strategies to develop their ideas such as comparison/contrast, cause and effect, examples, narration, description, and argumentation.
  4. Achieve a high interest level in their compositions by employing rhetorical devices such as parallelism, repetition, analogy, etc.
  5. Revise process papers to highlight the individual voice, improve sentence variety and style, and enhance subtlety of meaning and tone in ways that are consistent with purpose, audience, and genre.
  6. Prepare a multimedia presentation that demonstrates research and the use of technology.
  7. Employ the conventions of Standard English.

 


BEGINNING JOURNALISM

Recommended Placement: Eligible for College Prep-English
Credit: 10
Format: 1 semester solid block
Level of Difficulty: CP    
Students in this course learn about the media as it relates to our society today. The emphasis is on writing news stories, feature stories, sports stories, reviews and editorials. This course is a prerequisite for students desiring to work on the staff of El Vaquero, the school newspaper. Upon completion of the course, the student will be able to:

  1. Defend an editorial point of view.
  2. Write feature, sports, opinion, and news stories in proper journalistic form.
  3. Conduct an interview for the purpose of obtaining information for a news story.
  4. Have a basic understanding of how the mass media impacts society, as well as journalistic trends.
  5. Develop understanding of journalistic laws, regulations, and ethics.
  6. Read current and classic works of literature to develop an understanding of the range of journalism.
  7. Demonstrate an awareness of current events and newsworthy material.
  8. Write headlines and captions.
  9. Study design trends and create a page layout.
  10. Draw cartoons and take photographs.
  11. Produce a beginning journalism issue of El Vaquero as a class project.
  12. Demonstrate the ability to use primary and secondary sources in research.  

 


§ADVANCED JOURNALISM

Recommended Placement: Beg. Journalism & selection process
Credit: 5 each
Format: 1 semester, offered Fall and Spring semesters
Level of Difficulty: CP    

(For UC/CSU credit, this course may be repeated for a total of 10 credits, any additional credits will be applied to Irvine High School elective credit requirement.)
Students publish El Vaquero, the school newspaper, at regular intervals.

  • The class may be repeated.

Upon completion of the course, the student will be able to:

1.    Defend an editorial point of view.
2.     Produce effective, informative newspaper copy on contemporary issues under deadline pressure.
3.     Use effectively the basic journalistic skills relative to news writing, copy-reading, headline construction, proofreading, page-layout and makeup and style limitations.
4.     Develop increased sensitivity towards the pressures of writing for publication, which presupposes clear thinking and concise, accurate, objective, forceful and timely writing skills.
5.     Demonstrate the ability to use primary and secondary sources of information within a newspaper story.
6.     Demonstrate the ability to write in the various journalistic styles including new journalism, reviews, editorials, features, sports, and news stories.
7.    Compete in local, state and national writing competitions.
8.     Work cooperatively with other students in a team environment.
9.     Read contemporary and classic literature including books and periodicals which fall within the domain of journalism.
10.    Develop problem-solving and leadership skills.

 


§ADVANCED PLACEMENT ENGLISH language and composition:

LANGUAGE & COMPOSITION
Recommended Placement: 77% or higher H. Am. Lit and/or H. Brit. Lit.; & Teacher Rec.; Jr./Sr. standing
Credit: 10    
Format: 1 year alt. block
Level of Difficulty: CP, R    

The AP course in English Language and Composition engages students in becoming skilled readers of prose written in a variety of periods, disciplines, and rhetorical contexts, and in becoming skilled writers who compose for a variety of purposes.  Both their writing and their reading should make students aware of the interactions among a writer’s purposes, audience expectations, and subjects as well as the way generic conventions and the resources of language contribute to effectiveness in writing.

The goals of the AP English Language & Composition course are diverse because the college composition course is one of the most varied in the curriculum.  The course does, however,

  1. Provide students with opportunities to write about a variety of subjects and to demonstrate an awareness of audience and purpose
  2. Enable students to write effectively and confidently in college courses across the curriculum and in their professional communication as well as in personal and reflective writing
  3. Foster the development of writing in any context
  4. teach students that the expository, analytical and argumentative writing they must do in college is based on reading, not solely on personal experience and observation
  5. Teach students to read primary and secondary sources carefully
  6. Synthesize material from texts for use in their composition and to cite sources using conventions recommended by professional organizations such as the Modern Language Association (MLA)
  7. Enable students to read complex texts with understanding and to write prose of richness and complexity to communicate effectively with mature readers
  8. Help students move beyond such programmatic responses as the five-paragraph essay
  9. Encourage students to place emphasis on content, purpose, and audience and allow this focus to guide the organization of their writing.

 


§ADVANCED PLACEMENT english literature and composition

ENGLISH: LITERATURE & COMPOSITION
Recommended Placement: 77% or higher in H. Brit. Lit. or H. Am. Lit.; or 70 % or higher in AP English: Language and Composition, & Teacher Rec.; Sr. standing
Credit: 10    
Format: 1-year alt. block
Level of Difficulty: CP, R    

Designed for those in roughly the top 10% of the senior class, the course prepares students to earn college credit by passing the Advanced Placement Examination. Selected readings from a college reading list, research and reports on various representative literary figures and subjects are required. Test-taking skills, thinking skills, English usage, vocabulary, writing techniques and selected novels, plays, essays and poems are studied. Upon completion of the course, the student will be able to:

  1. Earn college credit by passing the AP Test.
  2. Write college level compositions & utilize an improved vocabulary.
  3. Demonstrate knowledge of major writers and analyze and discuss a poem, short story, play, essay or novel.
  4. Demonstrate knowledge of the structure of drama, poetry, novel and short story.
  5. Utilize research techniques.
  6. Utilize acceptable forms for the analytical/expository essay and effectively use the conventions of written English.
  7. Analyze and apply literary criticism in expository and analytical essays.

§ = Students are expected to spend additional hours beyond regular class time.

 

English Language Development

STRUCTURED ENGLISH IMMERSION: NEWCOMERS PROGRAM


ELD 1A/1B

Credits: 5 per semester
Recommended Placement: Language test placement
Grade Level: 9-12 Length: 1 year

Beginning English Language Development (ELD) is a class designed to meet the needs of students arriving in the U.S. with little or no English language skills. Initially, emphasis is placed on acquisition of English through listening/comprehension and speaking skills. Progressively, reading comprehension and writing skills are developed. Learning experiences will emphasize development of student proficiency in communication and interpretation in the English language. Upon completion of this course, the successful student will be able to meet English language development standards at the high beginning level for:

  1. Listening and speaking
  2. Reading
  3. Reading comprehension
  4. Writing strategies and conventions
  5. Literary response and analysis

This course meets only elective credit toward graduation from Irvine High School.


ELD 2A/2B

Recommended Placement: ELD 1, prior coursework and/or placement test.
Credit: 5 per semester
Format: 1 semester each alt. block; taken concurrently with English 1A/1B Sheltered
Level of Difficulty: NC

This course is designed for students with limited language proficiency. It introduces grammar and such functional skills as filling out forms, writing letters, interviewing, conducting phone conversations and following directions. Emphasis is placed upon building vocabulary and improving speaking, reading and writing skills. Students will also participate in cross-cultural activities designed to promote an understanding and appreciation of other cultures. American literature is emphasized as the reading component of the class. During this course, students will experience how to:

  1. Complete employment and other application forms.
  2. Spell and utilize vocabulary words in the proper context.
  3. Edit implementing knowledge or grammar, sentence structure, paragraphing and spelling.
  4. Write a short essay with minimum errors.
  5. Write business and personal letters using correct form.
  6. Utilize study techniques including annotation, note taking, dictionary, and library reference skills.
  7. Investigate and study skills needed for mastery of English proficiency test requirements.
  8. Identify differences and similarities of different cultures.
  9. Practice word attack skills to improve reading level.
  10. Identify literary terms and demonstrate understanding of terms by utilizing them to analyze American poetry, short stories and novels.
  11. Use peer-leveling vocabulary, SAT prep words, literary-based and college-prep vocabulary.

This course meets non-college preparatory English course credit toward graduation from Irvine High School.


ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS 1A/1B SHELTERED

Co-requisite: Taken concurrently with ELD 2A/2B
Credit: 5 per semester
Format: 1 semester each alt. block; taken concurrently with ELD 2A/2B
Level of Difficulty: NC

This sheltered English course is designed for limited English Language Learners with limited language proficiency. The course introduces EL students to American literature, poetry and American authors. Emphasis is placed on literary analysis as done in American classrooms, literary terminology, annotation of literary works, expository writing, creative writing and editing skills. During this course, students will experience how to:

  1. Utilize biographical research of American authors and poets to assist them when analyzing literature and poetry.
  2. Analyze literature and poetry using appropriate literary terminology.
  3. Annotate literary works in a way that will facilitate writing analytical essays regarding literature.
  4. Compose expository essays utilizing the various formats.
  5. Implement editing of peer writing utilizing appropriate grammar terminology.
  6. Self-edit utilizing appropriate grammar terminology.
  7. Analyze literature considering American culture, religion and history.
  8. Examine the effect of time periods on the genre and themes of literature.
  9. Use context clues to assist them when reading.
  10. Cite literary works in expository essays.
  11. Create short stories and poetry modeling literary works.

This course meets non-college preparatory English course credit toward graduation from Irvine High School.


ELD 3A/3B

Recommended Placement: ELD 2, prior coursework and/or placement test.
Credit: 10 per semester
Format: 1 semester each solid block
Level of Difficulty: ELD 3A NC (10), ELD 3B CP (10)

This college preparatory course is designed for limited English speaking students. Emphasis is placed upon skills required for the TOEFL examination and SAT prep work. These skills include oral comprehension, oral communication, vocabulary development, reading comprehension, and advanced writing techniques. Emphasis is placed on expository writing. Students will also participate in activities, which will emphasize advanced knowledge of American culture, and cross-cultural activities to promote an understanding and appreciation of other cultures. American literature is emphasized as the reading component of the class. During this course, students will experience how to:

  1. Spell and utilize vocabulary words in the proper context.
  2. Recognize and analyze literary forms.
  3. Make a 10-minute oral presentation.
  4. Complete a research paper.
  5. Complete an original story.
  6. Write a persuasive speech and present it orally.
  7. Identify similarities and differences of other cultures.
  8. Demonstrate advanced knowledge of American culture.
  9. Identify literary terms and demonstrate understanding of terms by utilizing them to analyze American poetry, short stories and novels.
  10. Use peer-leveling vocabulary, SAT prep words, literary-based and college-prep vocabulary.
  11. Edit implementing knowledge or grammar, sentence structure, paragraphing and spelling.
  12. Annotate as a means of literary analysis.
  13. Use peer-leveling vocabulary, SAT prep words, literary-based and college-prep vocabulary.
  14. Edit implementing knowledge or grammar, sentence structure, paragraphing and spelling.
  15. Annotate as a means of literary analysis.

ELD ENGLISH

Credits: 5 per semester
Recommended Placement: Concurrent Enrollment in ELD 1
Grade Level: 9-12 Length: 1 year

This course is designed for the English Language Learner and coincides with the curriculum and instruction in the ELD Science and ELD Social Science course. Vocabulary and writing skills are supported through the ELD 1 course. This curriculum is linked to the California Standards for English and includes instruction in literature and writing. Students respond to their reading in the form of written analysis, group discussions and formal presentation. Vocabulary and writing relates to fiction and non-fiction literature and includes literary analysis. Upon completion of the course, the student will be able to:

  1. Read and study fiction and non-fiction literature.
  2. Decode difficult text and annotate works for theme, plot, and character.
  3. Develop writing skills, advancing to multi paragraph essay.
  4. Understand correct sentence structure and grammar usage.
  5. Understand vocabulary and usage in the context of an introductory English literature course.

ELD SOCIAL SCIENCE

English Language Development Program
Credits: 5 per semester
Recommended Placement: Language test placement
Grade Level: 9-12 Length: 1 year

The class is presented to accommodate different levels of English mastery as well as provide the subject areas required by the Social Science Department. The student will read appropriate materials, complete written assignments, use technology, develop note taking skills and take tests on the material covered. The basic areas of text instruction are the following:

  1. Geography skills and concepts.
  2. American Government: organization and function of national, state, and local levels of government.
  3. Individual rights and responsibilities in a democratic society.

ELD SCIENCE

English Language Development Program
Credits: 5 per semester
Recommended Placement: Language test placement
Grade Level: 9-12 Length: 1 year

The class is presented to accommodate different levels of English mastery as well as provide the subject areas required by the Science Department. The student will read appropriate materials, complete written assignments, use technology, develop note taking skills and take tests on the material covered. The basic areas of instruction are the following: Components of being a Scientist, Formation of Earth, Geology, Climate-Weather, Ecology, Matter, Cellular Biology.

 

World Language

KOREAN 1

Credit: 10
Format: 1 semester solid block or 1 year alt. block
Level of Difficulty: CP

This course is designed to assist students to develop low-beginning level skills in the Korean language. These skills are speaking, listening, reading, and writing, as well as cultural understanding. This course will begin by introducing the writing and sound system of the Korean language. The remainder of the course will focus on grammatical patterns such as basic sentence structures, some grammatical points, and expressions. Upon completion of this course, the students will be able to:

  1. Use basic structure and simple conversational Korean
  2. Understand familiar words in limited social contexts
  3. Read short dialogues and passages
  4. Write short dialogues and paragraphs
  5. Have basic knowledge of Korean culture

KOREAN 2

Recommended Placement: 70% or above in previous course & teacher rec.
Credit: 10
Format: 1 semester solid block or 1 year alt. block  
Level of Difficulty: CP

This course is designed to assist students to develop mid-beginning level skills in the Korean language. These skills are speaking, listening, reading, and writing, as well as cultural understanding.  The students are expected to participate in class activities using the target language.  Emphasis is placed on improving language skills through the introduction of various tenses and expressions, and on expanding oral and written communication skills.  Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Use basic conversational Korean  
  2. Understand some short learned utterances in familiar contexts although misunderstandings and pauses for assimilation are frequent
  3. Read short dialogues and passages.
  4. Write short compositions
  5. Demonstrate greater knowledge of Korean culture

 
KOREAN 3

Recommended Placement: 70% or above in previous course & teacher rec.
Credit: 10
Format: 1 semester solid block or 1 year alt. block  
Level of Difficulty: CP

This course is designed to assist students to develop high-beginning level skills in the Korean language. These skills are speaking, listening, reading, and writing, as well as cultural understanding.  Emphasis is placed on grammatical structures and reading short stories, cultural pieces, and literary excerpts.  Conversational Korean is encouraged in class to improve fluency and comprehension.  Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Use intermediate structure and conversational Korean.
  2. Understand some short learned utterances in familiar contexts although misunderstandings and pauses for assimilation are frequent
  3. Read intermediate stories and excerpts  
  4. Write 2-4 paragraph compositions and detailed dialogues
  5. Demonstrate intermediate knowledge of Korean culture
  6. Take the Topik I (Level 1-2) exam

Honors KOREAN 4

Recommended Placement: 80% or above in previous course & teacher rec.
Credit: 10
Format: 1 semester solid block or 1 year alt. block  
Level of Difficulty: CP, R

Students in this intermediate course are assumed to have previous knowledge of Korean, which was taught in Korean 1, 2 and 3.  Students in this course will learn intermediate level skills in the areas of listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Korean, as well as expand their cultural understanding. Upon completion of this course, students are expected to acquire and use more vocabulary, expressions and sentence structures and to have a good command of Korean in various conversational situations. Students are expected to write short essays using the vocabulary, expressions, and sentence structures introduced. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Understand and use the spoken language in a large range of situations  
  2. Understand main ideas and/or some details from conversations related to a variety of contexts
  3. Understand and use a variety of sentence structure.
  4. Analyze and evaluate a variety of writings
  5. Write well-organized compositions in Korean
  6. Demonstrate an increased awareness of Korean culture
  7. Take the TOPIK II (level 3-6) exam

HONORS KOREAN 5

Recommended Placement: 80% or above in previous course & teacher rec.
Credit: 10
Format: 1 semester solid block or 1 year alt. block  
Level of Difficulty: CP, R  

This course is a continuation of Korean 4 and is equivalent in difficulty to an Advanced Placement course.  After the completion of this advanced course, students are expected to acquire and use more vocabulary, expressions, and sentence structures. Students are also expected to write well-organized full-length compositions.

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

1. Comprehend native daily spoken Korean in selected social situations.

2. Recognize and utilize advanced grammatical structures.

3. Comprehend reading of selected written passages in Korean.

4. Compare and contrast general aspects of culture and daily life of Korean speaking population.

5. Identify a wide variety of Korean cultural characteristics and out-looks.

6. Develop appreciation for historic, political and artistic individuals.

7. Identify and describe the influence of Korean culture upon America and the world.

8. Take the TOPIK II (Level 3-6) exam


FRENCH 1

Credit: 10    
Format: 1 semester solid block or 1 year alt. block
Level of Difficulty: CP    

This course serves an introduction to the French language and culture. Students are exposed to elementary vocabulary and structure of the language. Students become acquainted with the four basic tenets of language — listening, speaking, reading and writing and begin to attain proficiency in each of these skills. Instruction is student centered and communication-based.

Upon completion of this course, the students will be able to:

1. Take risks using the French language in everyday situations

2. Interpret meaning through various authentic resources

3. Write brief constructed responses and dialogues

4. Have basic knowledge of the French-speaking world

5. Compare cultures to better understand the importance of learning another language


FRENCH 2

Recommended Placement: 70% or above in previous course & teacher rec.
Credit: 10    
Format: 1 semester solid block or 1 year alt. block
Level of Difficulty: CP    

In this course, the students continue to develop their proficiency in the basic skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing in French thematic topics. The language used is authentic and current, reflecting the language spoken and read in a French speaking society. Instruction is student centered and communication-based.

Upon completion of the course, the students will be able to:

1. Take risks using the French language in everyday situations

2. Interpret meaning of various authentic resources

3. Create videos and oral presentations in French

4. Demonstrate greater knowledge of French culture

5. Compare cultures to better understand the importance of learning another language


FRENCH 3

Recommended Placement: 70% or above in previous course & teacher rec.
Credit: 10    
Format: 1 semester solid block or 1 year alt. block
Level of Difficulty: CP

This intermediate level reinforces and strengthens the basic objectives of French 1 and 2. The course is based on thematic units that will prepare the students for the next level of French. Students will read short stories, poems, and excerpts from French classics. French movies will be viewed as appropriate to each unit of study. Conversational French is encouraged in class to improve fluency and comprehension. Instruction is student centered and communication-based.

Upon completion of the course, the students will be able to:

1. Take risks using the French language in more complex situations

2. Interpret meaning of various authentic resources

3. Create videos and oral presentations in French

4. Compare cultures to better understand the importance of learning another language


HONORS FRENCH 4

Recommended Placement: 80% or above in French 3 & teacher rec.
Credit: 10    
Format: 1 year alt. block
Level of Difficulty: CP, R

This class is offered as a combo class with AP French Language, a rotating curriculum is used, therefore, students will not repeat material if they take both classes sequentially. All units of study are based on the AP themes; Families and Communities, Science and Technology, Beauty and Esthetics, Global Challenges, Personal and Public Identities, Contemporary Life. Students will be expected to read novels, short stories, poems, and plays in French. Students will explore French culture by watching French movies and discussing the different themes and genres. It is expected that students will converse in French while in class.

Upon completion of the course, the students will be able to:

  1. Use advanced structures in conversational French
  2. Read and discuss various genres of literature
  3. Write well-developed compositions
  4. Defend their opinions with supporting details

ADVANCED PLACEMENT FRENCH

Recommended Placement: 80% or above in Honors French 4 & teacher rec.
Credit: 10    
Format: 1 year alt. block
Level of Difficulty: CP, R

Conversational French is required in class. This class is offered as a combo class with Honors French 4, a rotating curriculum is used. All units of study are based on the AP themes; Families and Communities, Science and Technology, Beauty and Esthetics, Global Challenges, Personal and Public Identities, Contemporary Life. Students will be preparing for the AP French Language exam. Upon completion of the course, the students will be able to:

1. Use advanced structures in conversational and written French

2. Read, analyze and discuss a variety of genres

3. Write well-developed compositions

4. Take the AP French Language exam


SPANISH 1

Credit: 10    
Format: 1 semester solid block or 1 year alt. block
Level of Difficulty: CP

This introductory language course uses as a guide the National Standards of World Languages which assist the students in developing basic skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing. The students communicate in the target language using basic vocabulary. The students explore the various cultures of Hispanic people around the world including a study of geography, history, cultural traditions, art, music and daily life. Oral participation is stressed. Upon completion of this course, the students will be able to:

  1. Use basic structure and simple conversational Spanish
  2. Read short dialogues
  3. Write short dialogues and paragraphs
  4. Demonstrate an increased awareness and sensitivity of the various Hispanic cultures
  5. Give short oral presentations

SPANISH 2

Recommended Placement: 70% or above in previous course & teacher recommendation
Credit: 10    
Format: 1 semester solid block or 1 year alt. block
Level of Difficulty: CP

In this course, the students continue to develop basic speaking and listening skills and broaden their knowledge of grammar. The students are expected to participate in class activities using the target language. Emphasis is placed on improving language skills through the introduction of various tenses and idioms, and on improving oral and written communication skills. The students do more in-depth study of Hispanic cultures through the use of media, technology and reading materials. Upon completion of this course, the students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of the basic structure of the language
  2. Use basic conversational Spanish
  3. Read, write and present dialogues
  4. Read short passages
  5. Write short compositions

SPANISH 3

Recommended Placement: 70% or above in previous course & teacher recommendation
Credit: 10    
Format: 1 semester solid block or 1 year alt. block
Level of Difficulty: CP
In compliance with the National Standards, the students develop advanced listening and speaking skills and increase their knowledge and application of grammar. Emphasis is placed on advanced grammatical principles such as the subjunctive and conditional tenses. The students are expected to participate in class activities and use the target language consistently. The students continue to study culture and geography of Hispanic countries in the target language through the use of media, technology, and reading materials. Upon completion of the course, the students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate an advanced knowledge of language structure
  2. Demonstrate an increased proficiency in conversational Spanish
  3. Read, write and present dialogues
  4. Write compositions

HONORS SPANISH 4

Recommended Placement: 80% or above in previous course & teacher recommendation
Credit: 10    
Format: 1 semester solid block or 1 year alt. block
Level of Difficulty: CP, R    

This course will include critical essays, an extensive grammar review, and literature analysis. Emphasis will be placed on clarity and diction of speech patterns, rhetorical strategies, audience awareness, and correctness of language. This course is conducted entirely in Spanish. Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  1. Understand and use the spoken language in a large range of situations
  2. Express ideas, opinions, and feelings orally
  3. Analyze and evaluate a variety of writings
  4. Understand and use a variety of sentence structures
  5. Write a well-organized expository composition in Spanish
  6. Utilize various rhetorical strategies
  7. Demonstrate an increased awareness of Hispanic cultures and recognize cultural influences in the reading selections

SPANISH FOR NATIVE SPEAKERS 1

Recommended Placement:  Teacher evaluation and recommendation
Credit: 10
Format: 1 semester solid block
Level of Difficulty: CP
Students who can demonstrate oral fluency and a basic knowledge of written Spanish will improve their skills in composition, grammar and speaking.  Effective study skills will be emphasized.  Students will increase their reading comprehension skills through various reading selections, both fiction and non-fiction.  Students will write to describe, narrate and explain.  Students will develop speaking skills through discussions and presentations.  Students will listen to a variety of media to improve their understanding of spoken Spanish.  The culture of various Spanish- speaking countries will be studied as well.  At the end of this course students may advance to Spanish for Native Speakers 2.
Upon completion of this course students will be able to:

  1. Communicate effectively through spoken Spanish in a large range of situations.
  2. Communicate effectively through written Spanish.  
  3. Read authentic text in Spanish with confidence.  
  4. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the culture of various Spanish-speaking countries.  

SPANISH FOR NATIVE SPEAKERS 2

Recommended Placement:  Completion of Spanish for Native Speakers 1 with a 70% or above or teacher evaluation and recommendation
Credit: 10
Format: 1 semester solid block
Level of Difficulty: CP

Students who demonstrate oral fluency and a functional knowledge of written Spanish will be introduced to literature from Spain and Latin America. Students will read short stories, articles, plays and poetry.  Students will also continue to improve their skills in composition by writing to compare, contrast and persuade.  Students will continue to study the culture of various Spanish speaking countries and will recognize cultural influences in reading selections.  Students will continue to improve their understanding of spoken Spanish and their ability to speak through discussions, interviews and presentations.  At the end of this course students may advance to A.P. Spanish Language & Culture or A.P. Spanish Literature.
Upon completion of this course students will be able to:

  1. Read and understand advanced literature selections.  
  2. Write a well-organized composition to compare/contrast and to persuade.  
  3. Communicate ideas clearly and coherently through spoken Spanish in a presentational mode.
  4. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the culture of various Spanish-speaking countries and recognize cultural influences in literature.  

ADVANCED PLACEMENT SPANISH LANGUAGE & CULTURE

Recommended Placement: 80% or above in previous course & teacher rec
Credit: 10    
Format: 1 year alt. block
Level of Difficulty: CP, R

This course provides students with opportunities to develop language proficiency across the three modes of communication:  interpretive, interpersonal and presentational.  Students learn about culture through the use of authentic materials that are representative of the Spanish-speaking world.  Materials include journalistic and literary works, podcasts, interviews, movies, charts and graphs.  The course is conducted entirely in Spanish.
 
The course is divided into thematic units which are guided by essential questions.  Corresponding cultural elements are integrated into the study of the units and activities are directed with those cultural connections in mind.  Discussion of the topics completely in Spanish is a requirement for this course.  It is assumed that students have been previously exposed to advanced language structures in the courses leading up to the AP Spanish Language and Culture course; however, review of the mechanics is done within the contextual framework of each unit.

At the end of this course students will be prepared to take the AP Spanish Language and Culture Exam.

  1. Develop and refine listening, reading, writing and speaking skills
  2. Experience the spoken language in a large range of situations
  3. Express ideas, opinions and feelings orally
  4. Prepare for the Advanced Placement test for Spanish Language in the spring
  5. Read and analyze literature written by Hispanic authors.

 

ADVANCED PLACEMENT SPANISH LITERATURE

 

Recommended Placement: 3 or better on AP Spanish Language test or teacher recommendation

Credit: 10 units

Format: 1 year alt. block

Level of Difficulty: CP, R

 

This course is a college level introduction to the literatures of the Spanish-speaking communities in Latin America, Spain and the United States.  Organized around the six central literary themes of the AP Spanish Literature Exam, students will explore the most important ideas in literature from around the Spanish-speaking world.  Texts for the course will include essays, poems, dramatic works, short stories and novels in addition to important material from television programs, documentaries, movies, literary journals and newspapers.  A principle focus of the course is college composition and literary analysis and theory in addition to understanding literary texts in their proper cultural and historic contexts with a strong emphasis on using Spanish in all modalities of communication.  Students who take the course should already be proficient in writing essays in English, have an intense interest in literature and a strong command of the Spanish Language.  The entire course is conducted in Spanish in seminar format.

 

The Course Themes (from the AP Course Guide) Include:

  • Societies in Contact
  • The Construction of Gender
  • Time and Space
  • Literary Creation
  • Interpersonal Relationships
  • The Dual Nature of Being

 

Upon completion of this course, students will be prepared to take the AP Spanish Literature Exam and:

  • Communicate effectively about literature and conduct literary analysis of works in Spanish
  • Develop an appreciation for literary theory and its application to literary works from all genres
  • Learn interpretive modes of comprehension and expression related to literature and society
  • Appreciate the complex social, geographic and historical relationship between literary texts and their contexts.
  • Write concise, sophisticated college level literary essays on assigned topics
  • Develop appropriate research habits for literary investigation
  • Identify and employ proper sources to support literary analysis of assigned works

 

Mathematics

MATH PATHWAYS

Math Pathways


MATH I AB A/B                       Term: Yearlong Solid Block | Level: Math 1AB is non-CP, Math 1 CD is CP

This double-blocked Math I course will build on and extend skills learned in middle school while developing mastery and understanding of fundamental algebraic and geometric concepts, properties and skills. Students will explore the content of Math I with double the time of exposure with a focus on conceptual understanding and symbolic reasoning. The Mathematical Practice Standards apply throughout the two-year course and, together with the content standards, prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations.


MATH I A/B                             Term: Yearlong Alternating Block | Level: College Preparatory (CP)

The fundamental purpose of the Math I course is to formalize and extend students’ understanding of linear functions and their applications.  Students will learn how to differentiate between linear and nonlinear functions (most specifically, exponential functions), and will expand these concepts to understand arithmetic and geometric sequences. Math I uses properties and theorems involving congruent figures to deepen and extend geometric knowledge gained in prior grade levels. Additionally, students will learn introductory univariate and bivariate statistics. Throughout the course, student learning will focus on modeling and problem solving in order to promote the application of mathematics in real world settings. 


MATH II AB/CD                       Term: Yearlong Solid Block | Level: Math II AB is non-CP, Math II CD is CP

This double-blocked Math II course will build on and extend skills learned in Math I while developing mastery and understanding of fundamental algebraic and geometric concepts, properties and skills. Students will explore the content of Math II with double the time of exposure with a focus on conceptual understanding and symbolic reasoning. The Mathematical Practice Standards apply throughout the two-year course and, together with the content standards, prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations.


MATH II A/B                             Term: Yearlong Alternating Block | Level: College Preparatory (CP)

 Math II is the second course in the college preparatory math sequence. Instructional time will focus on five critical areas: extending the laws of exponents to rational exponents; comparing key features of quadratic functions with those of linear and exponential functions; creating and solving equations and inequalities involving linear, exponential, and quadratic expressions, including those with complex solutions; extending work with probability; and establishing criteria for similarity.  This course is aligned with the Common Core State Standards.


MATH II ENHANCED A/B          Term: Yearlong Alternating Block | Level: College Preparatory (CP)

 Enhanced Math II is the first course in the rigorous accelerated sequence of high school math courses. The seven major focuses are: 1) expanding understanding of functions to include quadratic and absolute value functions, 2) extending the laws of exponents to rational exponents, 3) creating and solving equations and inequalities to include complex solutions, 4) understanding similarity and right triangle trigonometry, 6) extending work with probability and similarity, and 7) expanding geometric reasoning to include the properties of circles.  This course is aligned with the California Common Core State Standards.


MATH III A/B                             Term: Yearlong Alternating Block | Level: College Preparatory (CP)

Math III is the third course in the college preparatory math sequence. The four major focuses are: expanding understanding of functions to include polynomial, rational, radical, and logarithmic functions; building on right triangle trigonometry to include general triangles and trigonometric functions and graphs; being able to model and solve real-life situations through the use of appropriate functions and geometry; and applying methods from probability and statistics to draw inferences and conclusions from data.  This course is aligned with the California Common Core State Standards.


MATH III ENHANCED A/B         Term: Yearlong Alternating Block | Level: Honors

Enhanced Math III is the second course in the rigorous accelerated sequence of high school math courses. Instructional time will focus on five critical areas: expanding understanding of functions to include polynomial, rational, and radical functions; extending their work with complex numbers; extending trigonometry to general triangles, trigonometric functions, reciprocal functions, and inverse functions; working with parametric and polar curves; and consolidating functions and geometry to create models and solve contextual problems. In addition, students will deepen and extend their understanding in each of these areas through study of advanced related topics and application to more complex problem solving situations, in order to prepare students for advanced mathematics at an accelerated pace. This course is aligned with the California Common Core State Standards.  Students are prepared for enrollment in AP Calculus BC after successful completion of Enhanced Math III.


BUSINESS FINANCE                  Term: Yearlong Alternating Block | Level: Non-College Preparatory (Non-CP)

 Business Finance is a two semester course. Students will learn how to apply mathematical concepts as a tool in their personal and business lives. Upon completion, students will understand terminology relating to personal and business mathematics applications.  Topics include budgeting, banking, credit, investing money, purchasing of autos and housing, life and health insurance, salaries and taxes, money management, and business careers. . They will use common mathematical formulas and skills like whole numbers, decimals, fractions, ratios and percent as they relate to these topics. 


AP STATISTICS A/B                   Term: Yearlong Alternating Block | Level: Advanced Placement (AP)

 AP Statistics is intended for students planning to major in mathematics or science in college.  The class incorporates the use of a graphing calculator. Topics included are probability, random variables, measures of central tendency, inference, designing experiments and simulations, displaying data, and analysis of variance.  


MATH IV                                      Term: Yearlong Alternating Block | Level: College Preparatory (CP)

 Math IV is the final class in the college prep integrated math sequence.  It is designed for the student who has successfully completed Math III. Topics previously studied in the Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Integrated Math III courses are examined more closely.  New topics include Gauss-Jordan elimination, linear programming, finite mathematics theorems, polar coordinates, limits and continuity. This course prepares students for AP Calculus AB.


AP CALCULUS AB                       Term: Yearlong Alternating Block | Level: Advanced Placement (AP)

AP Calculus AB is a course for students who have completed Math IV or Enhanced Math III successfully.  Students will study major topics of mathematics outlined by the College Board including: limits and continuity, derivatives, applications of derivatives, integrals, and differential equations. 

Note:  Students may not enroll in AP Calculus AB after dropping AP Calculus BC during the same school year


AP CALCULUS BC                        Term: Yearlong Alternating Block | Level: Advanced Placement (AP)

 This class is designed to provide students with a clear understanding of the ideas of calculus as a solid foundation for subsequent courses in mathematics and other disciplines. Students will develop their calculus skills through graphical, numerical and algebraic methods. This college level course covers topics as outlined by the College Board including limits and continuity, derivatives, integrals, differential equations, Taylor series, parametric/polar/vector functions, and applications.

Note:  Students may not enroll in AP Calculus AB after dropping AP Calculus BC during the same school year.


Performing Arts


CONCERT CHORALE F/S

 

Credit: 10 units

Format: 1 year alt. block

Level of Difficulty: CP

CONCERT CHORALE is a beginning level singing ensemble open to all students.  No experience needed. No audition is required.  Everyone is welcome.

Students will acquire skills in reading music notation and in vocal production.  Through singing, students will express themselves creatively.  During the course of the year, students will gain historical and cultural perspective by studying, analyzing, and performing music from across the historical spectrum.  Through written and oral analysis of texts and music being performed, students will connect and apply analytic skills learned in other courses.  Through participation in concerts and festivals, singers will respond to and assess the technical and aesthetic aspects of choral performance.  By working with varied instrumental ensembles in concert and by working with guest conductors and vocal specialists, students will gain an understanding of the choral art in relation to other performance disciplines and will develop an awareness of the various facets of the music profession.  
What can students expect to learn in Concert Chorale:

  • Learn music literacy and performing skills
  • Develop vocal technique  and musicianship skills
  • Perform in choir concerts
  • Make new friends
  • Express yourself creatively through music
  • Gain life skills that will transfer to other academic classes
  • Have a great time making life-long memories

§Students are expected to attend all rehearsals and performances of the Concert Chorale.


§TREBLE CHORUS F/S

Credit: 10 units    
Format: 1 year alt. block
Level of Difficulty: CP    

TREBLE CHORUS is a singing ensemble open to students in all grades who sing in the treble register.  No audition is required.

Students will acquire skills in reading music notation and in vocal production.  Through singing, students will express themselves creatively.  During the course of the year, students will gain historical and cultural perspective by studying, analyzing, and performing music from across the historical spectrum.  Through written and oral analysis of texts and music being performed, students will connect and apply analytic skills learned in other courses.  Through participation in concerts and festivals, singers will respond to and assess the technical and aesthetic aspects of choral performance.  By working with varied instrumental ensembles in concert and by working with guest conductors and vocal specialists, students will gain an understanding of the choral art in relation to other performance disciplines and will develop an awareness of the various facets of the music profession.  
What students can expect to experience in Treble Chorus:

  • Learn music literacy and performing skills
  • Develop vocal technique and musicianship skills
  • Perform in choir concerts
  • Make new friends
  • Express yourself creatively through music
  • Gain life skills that will transfer to other academic classes

§Students are expected to attend all rehearsals and performances of the Treble Chorus.


§CANTA BELLA A/B

Audition Required
Credit: 10 units
Format: 1 year alt. block
Level of Difficulty: CP
CANTA BELLA is a singing ensemble open to females in grades 10-12. Selection for Canta Bella is dependent upon appropriate balance of voice parts. Membership is by audition only.

Students will acquire skills in reading music notation and in vocal production. Through singing, students will express themselves creatively. During the course of the year, students will gain historical and cultural perspective by studying, analyzing, and performing music from across the historical spectrum. Through written and oral analysis of texts and music being performed, students will connect and apply analytic skills learned in other courses. Through participation in concerts and festivals, singers will respond to and assess the technical and aesthetic aspects of choral performance. By working with varied instrumental ensembles in concert and by working with guest conductors and vocal specialists, students will gain an understanding of the choral art in relation to other performance disciplines and will develop an awareness of the various facets of the music profession.
What students can expect to experience in Canta Bella:

  • Learn music literacy and performing skills
  • Develop advanced vocal technique and musicianship
  • in choir concerts, festivals, and community performances
  • Make life-long friends
  • Express yourself creatively through classical and pop styles
  • Gain life skills that will transfer to other academic classes
  • Have a great time making life-long memories

§ Students are expected to attend all rehearsals and performances of the Canta Bella.


§IRVINE HIGH SCHOOL CHORALE A/B

Audition Required
Credit: 10 units
Format: 1 year alt. block
Level of Difficulty: CP, D
    

The IHS Chorale is a mixed singing ensemble intended for singers of advanced ability.  Selection for IHS Chorale is dependent upon appropriate balance between sopranos, altos, tenors and basses. Membership is by audition only.

Students will acquire skills in reading music notation and in vocal production.  Through singing, students will express themselves creatively.  During the course of the year, students will gain historical and cultural perspective by studying, analyzing, and performing music from across the historical spectrum.  Through written and oral analysis of texts and music being performed, students will connect and apply analytic skills learned in other courses.  Through participation in concerts and festivals, singers will respond to and assess the technical and aesthetic aspects of choral performance.  By working with varied instrumental ensembles in concert and by working with guest conductors and vocal specialists, students will gain an understanding of the choral art in relation to other performance disciplines and will develop an awareness of the various facets of the music profession.  

What students can expect  to experience in Chorale?

  • Learn music literacy and performing skills
  • Continue developing strong vocal technique
  • Perform in choir concerts and a festival
  • Make life-long friends
  • Express yourself creatively through classical and pop styles
  • Gain life skills that will transfer to other academic classes
  • Have a great time making life-long memories

§ - Students are expected to attend all rehearsals and performances of the IHS CHORALE.  


§IRVINE SINGERS A/B

Audition Required
Credit: 10 units
Format: 1 year alt. block
Level of Difficulty: CP, D

Irvine Singers is a mixed singing ensemble that specializes in the performance of challenging literature of diverse genre.  Membership is by audition only.

Students will acquire skills in reading music notation and in vocal production.  Through singing, students will express themselves creatively.  During the course of the year, students will gain historical and cultural perspective by studying, analyzing, and performing music from across the historical spectrum.  Through written and oral analysis of texts and music being performed, students will connect and apply analytic skills learned in other courses.  Through participation in concerts and festivals, singers will respond to and assess the technical and aesthetic aspects of choral performance.  By working with varied instrumental ensembles in concert and by working with guest conductors and vocal specialists, students will gain an understanding of the choral art in relation to other performance disciplines and will develop an awareness of the various facets of the music profession.  

What  students can expect to experience in Irvine Singers:

  • Learn music literacy and performing skills
  • Develop advanced vocal technique and musicianship skills
  • Perform in choir concerts, festivals, and community performances
  • Make life-long friends
  • Express yourself creatively through classical and pop styles
  • Gain life skills that will transfer to other academic classes
  • Have a great time making life-long memories

Students are expected to attend all rehearsals and performances of the IRVINE SINGERS.  

§ = Students will be expected to spend additional hours beyond the regular class time.


*§CONCERT BAND A/B

Appropriate Skill Level Required
Credit: 10 units    
Format: 1 year alt. block
Level of Difficulty: CP    
Concert Band is a performing ensemble that studies medium-easy to medium grade level music. Students will study basic theory and vocabulary used in concert literature. During the learning process, students will discover the historical concepts for various styles of wind music. Students will understand and demonstrate music as a way to create and communicate meaning and emotion. They will identify and demonstrate listening skills, and analyze group and individual performances using appropriate musical language and pedagogical skills related to their chosen instruments.  Guest clinicians and conductors will be used throughout the course to extend the students’ knowledge of instrument skills and music literature. Students will develop fundamental artistic and aesthetic understanding by writing critiques of live music concerts.  Communication and interpretation skills will be used by the students while producing and performing in their own concerts, which may include collaboration with other arts disciplines.

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Decode musical notation.
  2. Demonstrate the use of basic music vocabulary and terminology.
  3. Show aesthetic valuing with written critiques of live music rehearsals and performances.
  4. Through rehearsal and performance settings, students will develop the ability to read and synthesize musical notation and terminology from various classical periods and popular forms of music.
  5. Demonstrate well-developed rehearsal and performance skills.
  6. Play expressively, with appropriate dynamics, phrasing, and interpretation.

Assessment Techniques:

  • Written exams on music terminology and theory.
  • Written and oral critiques of professional and amateur music concerts.
  • Public performances and music festivals.
  • Small ensemble and individual assessments.
  • Music Software

Instructional Materials:

  • Sheet Music
  • Reference Texts and Internet
  • Music Software

§SYMPHONIC BAND A/B

Audition Required
Credit: 10 units    
Format: 1 year alt. block
Level of Difficulty: CP    

Symphonic Band is a performing ensemble that studies level 3-5 music literature. Students will study intermediate theory and vocabulary used in concert literature. During the learning process, students will discover the historical concepts for various styles of wind music. Students will understand and demonstrate music as a way to create and communicate meaning and emotion. They will identify and demonstrate listening skills, and analyze group and individual performances using appropriate musical language and pedagogical skills related to their chosen instruments.  Guest clinicians and conductors will be used throughout the course to extend the students’ knowledge of instrument skills and music literature. Students will develop fundamental artistic and aesthetic understanding by writing critiques of live music concerts.  Communication and interpretation skills will be used by the students while producing and performing in their own concerts, which may include collaboration with other arts disciplines.
Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Decode musical notation.
  2. Demonstrate the use of intermediate music vocabulary and terminology.
  3. Show aesthetic valuing with written critiques of live music rehearsals and performances.
  4. Through rehearsal and performance settings, students will develop the ability to read and synthesize musical notation and terminology from various classical periods and popular forms of music.
  5. Demonstrate well-developed rehearsal and performance skills.
  6. Play expressively, with appropriate dynamics, phrasing, and interpretation.

Assessment Techniques:

  • Written exams on music terminology and theory.
  • Written and oral critiques of professional and amateur music concerts.
  • Public performances and music festivals.
  • Small ensemble and individual assessments.
  • Music software

Instructional Materials:

  • Sheet Music    
  • Reference Texts   
  • Music Software

§WIND SYMPHONY A/B

Audition and Marching Band Required
Credit: 10 units
Format: 1 year alt. block    
Level of Difficulty: CP, D

Wind Symphony is an advanced performing ensemble that studies medium, medium-advanced and advanced music literature. Students will study advanced theory and vocabulary used in concert literature. During the learning process, students will discover the historical concepts for various styles of wind music. Students will understand and demonstrate music as a way to create and communicate meaning and emotion. They will identify and demonstrate listening skills, and analyze group and individual performances using appropriate musical language and pedagogical skills related to their chosen instruments.  Guest clinicians and conductors will be used throughout the course to extend the students’ knowledge of instrument skills and music literature as well as develop an awareness of the various facets of the music profession.  Students will develop fundamental artistic and aesthetic understanding by writing critiques of live music concerts.  Communication and interpretation skills will be used by the students while producing and performing in their own concerts, which may include collaboration with other arts disciplines

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Decode musical notation.
  2. Demonstrate the use of advanced music vocabulary and terminology.
  3. Show aesthetic valuing with written critiques of live music rehearsals and performances.
  4. Through rehearsal and performance settings students will develop the ability to read and synthesize musical notation and terminology from various classical periods and popular forms of music.
  5. Demonstrate well-developed rehearsal and performance skills.
  6. Play expressively, with appropriate dynamics, phrasing, and interpretation.

Assessment Techniques:

  • Written exams on music terminology and theory.
  • Written and oral critiques of professional and amateur music concerts.
  • Public performances and music festivals.
  • Small ensemble and individual assessments.

Instructional Materials:

  • Sheet Music
  • Reference Texts
  • Music Software

*§JAZZ ENSEMBLE 1A/1B

Audition Required; Must Be Enrolled in Marching Band
Credit: 7.5 units
Format: 1.5 semesters; zero period daily
Level of Difficulty: CP, D     

Jazz Ensemble I concentrates on the study and performance of jazz styles which include swing, blues, Latin, and funk. The student will be introduced to the art of jazz improvisation. Credit for this class is awarded on the basis of participation at rehearsals, concerts, and festivals, in addition to the instructor’s evaluation of the student’s performance ability.  This ensemble performs at assemblies, concerts, sporting events, and festivals. Upon completion of the course, the student will be able to:

  1. Perform music in swing, blues, Latin, and jazz-rock-funk styles.
  2. Demonstrate jazz solo skills.
  3. Perform at rallies, assemblies, concerts, and jazz festivals.
  4. Perform at home basketball games.

§JAZZ ENSEMBLE 2A/2B

Audition required; Must Be Enrolled in Marching Band
Credit: 7.5 units
Format: 1.5 semesters; zero period daily
Level of Difficulty: CP

Jazz Ensemble II concentrates on the study and performance through the many styles of jazz music. This ensemble performs at assemblies, concerts, sporting events, and festivals. Upon completion of the course, the student will be able to:

  1. Perform music in swing and jazz-rock styles.
  2. Demonstrate jazz solo skills.
  3. Perform at rallies, assemblies, concerts, and jazz festivals.
  4. Perform at home basketball games.

§ = Students will be expected to spend additional hours beyond the regular class time.


§MARCHING BAND

Appropriate Skill Level Required
Credit: 2.5 units    
Format: zero period daily; offered fall (1st nine weeks)
Level of Difficulty: NC    
This class is open to all students interested in participation in a Marching Band which will perform at football games and parades. Credit for this class is awarded on the basis of participation at rehearsals and performances, in addition to the instructor's evaluation of the students’ performance ability. Upon completion of the course, the student will be able to:

  1. Coordinate marching and playing skills at the same time.
  2. Memorize and execute precision marching drill.
  3. Participate in half-time shows, parades, and field tournaments.

Students in this class should enroll concurrently in Concert Band, Symphonic Band, Wind Symphony, Philharmonic Orchestra, Concert Orchestra, OR Symphonic Orchestra. Credit for Marching Band may be applied to the P.E. requirement; however, 9th graders must enroll in P.E. concurrently with Marching Band.


§PERCUSSION ENSEMBLE A/B

Appropriate Skill Level Required
Credit: 5 units    
Format: 1 year alt. block
Level of Difficulty: CP
Percussion Ensemble is a performing ensemble that studies class medium-easy, medium and medium-advanced grade level music literature. Students will study advanced theory and vocabulary used in concert literature. During the learning process, students will discover the historical concepts for various styles of wind and percussion music. Students will understand and demonstrate music as a way to create and communicate meaning and emotion. They will identify and demonstrate listening skills, and analyze group and individual performances using appropriate musical language and pedagogical skills related to their chosen instruments.  Guest clinicians and conductors will be used throughout the course to extend the students’ knowledge of instrument skills and music literature. Students will develop fundamental artistic and aesthetic understanding by writing critiques of live music concerts.  Communication and interpretation skills will be used by the students while producing and performing in their own concerts, which will include collaboration with other arts disciplines.

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Decode musical notation.
  2. Demonstrate the use of advanced music vocabulary and terminology.
  3. Show aesthetic valuing with written critiques of live music rehearsals and performances.
  4. Through rehearsal and performance settings students will develop the ability to read and synthesize musical notation and terminology from various classical periods and popular forms of music.
  5. Demonstrate well-developed rehearsal and performance skills.
  6. Play expressively, with appropriate dynamics, phrasing, and interpretation.

Assessment Techniques:

  • Written exams on music terminology and theory.
  • Written and oral critiques of professional and amateur music concerts.
  • Public performances and music festivals.
  • Small ensemble and individual assessments.

Instructional Materials:

  • Sheet Music
  • Reference Texts
  • Music Software

*§CONCERT ORCHESTRA A/B

Prior experience required
Credit: 10 units    
Format: 1 year alt. block
Level of Difficulty: CP

Concert Orchestra is the entry level orchestra for all orchestra students. Students have the option to audition for Symphonic or Philharmonic Orchestra in June for the following school year.
Concert Orchestra studies music literature from the baroque, classic, renaissance, romantic and modern periods.  Basic string playing practices are reviewed in this class and built upon.
Assessment Techniques:

  • Written exams on music terminology and theory.
  • Written and oral critiques of professional and amateur music concerts.
  • Public performances and music festivals.
  • Small ensemble and individual assessments.

Instructional Materials:

  • Sheet Music
  • Reference Texts
  • Music Software

*§PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA A/B

Teacher Approval and Audition Required
Credit: 10 units    
Format: 1 year alt. block
Level of Difficulty: CP, D

Philharmonic Orchestra is an advanced performing ensemble that studies class level 4-6 music literature.  Students will study advanced theory and vocabulary used in concert literature.  During the learning process, students will discover the historical concepts for various styles and periods of orchestra music.  Students will understand and demonstrate music as a way to create and communicate meaning and emotion.  They will identify and demonstrate listening skills, and analyze group and individual performances using appropriate musical language and pedagogical skills related to their chosen instrument.  Guest clinicians and conductors will be used throughout the course to extend the students’ knowledge of instrument skills and music literature as well as develop an awareness of the various facets of the music profession.  Students will develop fundamental artistic and aesthetic understanding by writing critiques of live music concerts.  Communication and interpretation skills will be used by the students while producing and performing in their own concerts, which may include collaboration with other arts disciplines.
Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Decode musical notation.
  • Demonstrate the use of advanced music vocabulary and terminology.
  • Show aesthetic valuing with written critiques of live music rehearsals and performances.
  • Through rehearsal and performance settings, students will develop the ability to read and synthesize musical notation and terminology from various classical periods and popular forms of music.
  • Demonstrate well-developed rehearsal and performance skills.
  • Play expressively, with appropriate dynamics, phrasing, and interpretation.

Assessment Techniques:

  • Written exams on music terminology and theory.
  • Written and oral critiques of professional and amateur music concerts.
  • Public performances and music festivals.
  • Small ensemble and individual assessments.

Instructional Materials:

  • Sheet music
  • Reference texts
  • Music Software

§SYMPHONIC ORCHESTRA A/B

Audition or Teacher Recommendation Required
Credit: 10 units    
Format: 1 year alt. block
Level of Difficulty: CP, M    

Symphonic Orchestra is an intermediate to advanced performing ensemble that studies medium-easy, medium and medium-advanced grade level music literature.  Students will study theory and vocabulary used in concert literature.  During the learning process, students will discover the historical concepts for various styles and periods of orchestra music.  Students will understand and demonstrate music as a way to create and communicate meaning and emotion.  They will identify and demonstrate listening skills, and analyze group and individual performances using appropriate musical language and pedagogical skills related to their chosen instrument.  Guest clinicians and conductors will be used throughout the course to extend the students’ knowledge of instrument skills and music literature as well as develop an awareness of the various facets of the music profession.  Students will develop fundamental artistic and aesthetic understanding by writing critiques of live music concerts.  Communication and interpretation skills will be used by the students while producing and performing in their own concerts, which may include collaboration with other arts disciplines.

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Decode musical notation.
  • Demonstrate the use of advanced music vocabulary and terminology.
  • Show aesthetic valuing with written critiques of live music rehearsals and performances.
  • Through rehearsal and performance settings, students will develop the ability to read and synthesize musical notation and terminology from various classical periods and popular forms of music.
  • Demonstrate well-developed rehearsal and performance skills.
  • Play expressively, with appropriate dynamics, phrasing, and interpretation.

Assessment Techniques:

  • Written exams on music terminology and theory.
  • Written and oral critiques of professional and amateur music concerts.
  • Public performances and music festivals.
  • Small ensemble and individual assessments.

Instructional Materials:

  • Sheet music
  • Reference texts
  • Music Software

MUSIC-INDEPENDENT STUDY

Instructor Approval Required
Credit: Variable    
Format: 1 year alt. block
Level of Difficulty: NC

Independent Study is designed to allow students to pursue learning goals which interest them, but which are NOT part of the regular course offerings. Prior to registration, the student and his supervising teacher complete a formal agreement using the Request for Independent Study Credit form. The contract will specify the objectives of the activity, the resources required to accomplish the objectives, and a plan for evaluation of the work. Such projects require approval of the supervising teacher, the teacher advisor, department coordinator, parent and principal. The forms are available from Counselors or department coordinators.


GUITAR 1 F/S

Credit: 5 units
Format: 1 semester alt. block
Level of Difficulty: CP     

Guitar presents instruction in classical and folk guitar techniques.  Students will acquire skills in reading music notation and guitar tablature.  Through practice and performance, students will express themselves creatively.  During the course of the year, students will gain historical and cultural perspective by studying, analyzing and performing music from across the historical spectrum.  Through analysis of recorded and live performances, students will respond to and assess the technical and aesthetic aspects of guitar performance.  By working with clinicians and guest artists, students will gain an understanding of performance discipline and will develop an awareness of the various facets of the music profession.

Upon completion of the class, the student will be able to:

  1. Read notation on all strings in first position.
  2. Know 8 basic I-IV-V7 progressions.
  3. Perform competently as a soloist and as a member of an ensemble.
  4. Display knowledge of musical terminology.
  5. Demonstrate performance in major and minor keys.

Assessments will include:

  1. Oral and written tests on music and guitar terminology.
  2. Oral and written critique by peers and by faculty.
  3. Public performance.

GUITAR 2 F/S

Recommended Placement: Guitar 1 F/S with a grade of A or B and/or Teacher Rec.
Credit: 5 units
Format: 1 semester alt. block
Level of Difficulty: CP     

GUITAR 2 builds on all of the skills developed in Guitar 1 and adds to its knowledge of blues basics, barre chords, fingerpicking, 5th position and tablature recognition.

Upon completion of the class, the student will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate all of the skills taught in guitar
  2. Create a basic blues solo.
  3. Know how barre chords work.
  4. Play a basic 5th position scale.
  5. Play a solo finger picking piece.

Assessments will include:
1.    Oral and written tests on music and guitar terminology.
2.    Oral and written critique by peers and by faculty.
3.    Public performance.


PIANO S

Credits:  5 units    
Format:  1 semester alt. block
Level of Difficulty: CP

Students enrolled in PIANO will acquire skills in reading music notation and proper piano technique.  Through practice and performance, students will express themselves creatively.  During the course of the year, students will gain historical and cultural perspective by studying, analyzing and performing music from across the historical spectrum.  Through analysis of recorded and live performances, students will respond to and assess the technical and aesthetic aspects of piano performance.  By working with clinicians and guest artists, students will gain an understanding of performance discipline and will develop an awareness of the various facets of the music profession.
Upon completion of the class, the student will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate the ability to sight-read.
  2. Perform competently as a soloist.
  3. Display knowledge of musical terminology.
  4. Demonstrate performance in major and minor keys.

Assessments will include:

  • Oral and written tests on music terminology.
  • Oral and written critique by peers and by faculty.
  • Music software.

§ MUSIC THEORY

Credit: 5 units    
Format: 1 semester alt. block
Level of Difficulty: NC     

Music Theory is open to all students. It is recommended for sophomores and/or juniors who plan to enroll in Advanced Placement Music Theory. However, it is also for those wishing to simply acquire a broader understanding of music. Upon completion of the course, the student will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate fluency with all major and minor scales.
  2. Demonstrate ability to perform difficult rhythmic passages.
  3. Demonstrate understanding of intervals.
  4. Analyze a harmonic passage of medium difficulty.
  5. Write two-part melodies from dictation.

§ ADVANCED PLACEMENT MUSIC THEORY A/B

Student needs teacher recommendation.
Credit: 10 units    
Format: 1 year alt. block
Level of Difficulty: CP, R

Designed for student musicians with advanced skills and strong interest in music, this course prepares students for the Advanced Placement Examination.  The course integrates aspects of melody, harmony, texture, rhythm, form, and to some extent, history and style.  Ability to read and write basic music notation is required.

Because of the abundance of collegiate and professional musical performances in the area, students will be expected to attend many concerts and provide written evaluations of those performances.  

Upon completion of the course, the student will be able to:

  1. Earn college credit for Freshman Music Theory by passing the Advanced Placement Test.
  2. Demonstrate speed and fluency in working with basic musical notation.
  3. Demonstrate skill in melodic, harmonic and rhythmic dictation.
  4. Demonstrate ability to sight-sing four to eight measure melodies in major and minor tonalities.
  5. Demonstrate appropriate compositional and analytical skills, and
  6. Demonstrate awareness of major stylistic periods in music history.

DANCE TECH 1 F/S

Credits: 5 units per semester
Grade Level: 9-12  
Format: 1 semester alt. block
Level of Difficulty: NC

Dance Tech 1 is the beginning study of dance as a theatrical art form. Students will study basic dance techniques and vocabulary used in choreography, jazz, ballet, tap, and modern dance. Students will study the history of different dance styles and choreography.
Students will study improvisation and basic choreography theory by developing dance projects. Students will be involved in critical thinking and problem solving when utilizing choreography elements to create a dance. Students will develop fundamental artistic and aesthetic understanding when writing critiques on live dance concerts and dance video. They will analyze the use of costumes, lighting and choreography.  Students will perform a group piece in the spring concert.
This class is counted as physical education credit.  This course does not replace Freshman PE.  Freshmen taking this course must also be enrolled in Freshman PE or a team sport.


§ DANCE TECH 2 A/B

Credits: 5 units per semester
Audition Required
Grade Level: 9-12  
Format: 1 year alt. block
Level of Difficulty: CP, M     
 
Dance Tech 2 is the continued study of dance as an art form. Students will study intermediate dance techniques and vocabulary used in jazz, ballet, tap, modern dance and choreography. Students will be involved in the development and/or performance of a group dance piece to be performed in the dance concerts. Students will identify and demonstrate movement elements and skills, and the understanding of choreographic principles, processes, and structures. The theory of choreography will be taught through the use of theme and variation, unity and rhythmic organization, and improvisation.
This class may be counted as either physical education credit or visual arts credit.  This course can replace Freshman PE.  


§ DANCE TECH 3 A/B

Credits:  5 units per semester
Audition Required
Grade Level: 9-12
Format: 1 year alt block
Level of Difficulty: CP, M

Dance Tech 3 is the continued study of dance as an art form.  Students will continue to focus on technique, vocabulary, and dance history in jazz, ballet, modern, tap, and choreography.  Students will explore choreographic skills, principles, and processes.  Students will focus on several choreographic projects including a student choreographed showcase.  Selected choreographic pieces will be performed in the dance concerts.  Students will make critical assessments of dances through in class practice as well as dance concerts through critique assignments. Students are required to perform in dance concerts to demonstrate successful completion of the course. This class may be counted as either physical education credit or visual arts credit.  This course can replace Freshman PE.  


DANCE TECH 4 A/B

Credits:  5 units per semester
Audition Required
Grade Level: 9-12
Format: 1 year alt block
Level of Difficulty: CP, D

Dance Tech 4 is the continued study of dance as an art form.  Students will continue to reach for mastery in technique.  Dance history and vocabulary is further refined.  Students will focus on several choreographic projects including a student choreographed showcase.  Selected choreographic pieces will be performed in the dance concerts.  Students will continue to critique and explore the assessment of dance.  Students will take more of a leadership role in teaching dance to others.   Students are required to perform in dance concerts  and showcases to demonstrate successful completion of the course. This class may be counted as either physical education credit or visual arts credit.  This course can replace Freshman PE.  


§ IHS DANCE ENSEMBLE A/B (COMPANY)

Credits: 5 per semester  
Audition Required
Grade Level: 9-12  
Length: 1 year alt. block (may not enter at semester)
Level of Difficulty: CP, D    

This class is devoted to the development of the choreography for various dance performances throughout the year.  The class will also be involved in rehearsals for the development of a complete dance concert.  This will include developing individual and group dances, coordinating costumes, and designing special effects needed to highlight the production.   This class will also provide a continuing education in the areas of dance technique and choreography theory.  This class may be counted as either physical education credit or visual arts credit.  


CREATIVE DRAMA F

Credit: 5 units     
Format: 1 semester alt. block
Level of Difficulty: CP     
This course is an introduction to the study and practice of Drama and is intended to build the confidence and composure needed for a live stage performance.  No previous acting experience is required.  In this class, students will learn proper vocal technique for live stage performance, the terminology of theatre, the process of preparing for a performance, and how to write a play performance critique.   Performances will include both individual and duo or group assignments.  All performances for this class take place in the classroom, not for the general public.


CREATIVE DRAMA S

Credit: 5 units     
Format: 1 semester alt. block
Level of Difficulty: CP
This course is a continuation of Creative Drama F, and the skills learned in the previous course are fundamental to success in the spring semester.  All Creative Drama (S) students will perform in the Spring Theatre Arts Showcase for the general public.  Students will engage in the entire theatre performance process, from auditions to script analysis, rehearsal, performance and reflection.  In addition to preparations for the Spring Showcase, students will also study the history of Broadway and American Musical Theatre as well as audition techniques that will prepare them to audition for Intermediate and Advanced Drama, the fall play, the musical as well as community theatre or college admission.


§ INTERMEDIATE DRAMA A/B

Audition Required
Credit: 5 units per semester  
Format: 1 year alt. block
Level of Difficulty: CP     
This course will explore various acting techniques for both stage and screen.  Students will learn to analyze a script and develop a character through research, observation, imagination and improvisation.  Students will engage in many exercises that will develop the skills needed to create a believable character, and they will apply this to several performance projects including monologues and duo or group scenes.  Students will also learn to write a meaningful play performance critique, as well as audition techniques applicable to on campus productions, community theatre and college admissions.
Intermediate Drama students are also eligible to participate in theatre festivals where students perform for adjudicators and compete with students from all over the Southern California region.

This course also focuses on Children's Theatre through our annual production for local elementary schools.  Intermediate Drama students develop a Children's Theatre production including writing the script, staging/choreography, costumes, props, etc. and travel the production to local schools for a special in-school assembly.
Intermediate Drama students all perform in the Spring Theatre Arts Showcase.
§ = Students will be expected to spend additional hours beyond the regular class time.


§ ADVANCED DRAMA A/B

Audition Required
Credit: 5 units per semester  
Format: 1 year alt. block
Level of Difficulty: CP    
The emphasis of Advanced Drama is fully realized theatrical productions through the application of skills learned in previous courses such as script analysis, acting technique and directing.  Students will direct, produce, design and act in multiple productions throughout the year for performance for Irvine High students as well as the general public.  Some rehearsal time outside of the class meeting time will be required.  Students will also prepare monologues and/or scenes for entry in to adjudicated theatre festivals (minimum of 1 entry per semester).
§ = Students will be expected to spend additional hours beyond the regular class time.


§TECHNICAL THEATRE

Credit: 5 units per semester    
Format: 1 semester alt. block
Level of Difficulty: CP     

The curriculum is aligned to the CA CTE Model Curriculum Standards and Career Ready Standards for the Sector Arts, Media, and Entertainment and the Production and Managerial Arts- Tech Theater/Music Tech career pathway.
The Beginning Tech Theatre course is designed to teach students the skills and terminology of the various technical fields of live event and theatre production.  Over the course of two semesters, the class will address the following fields:  

  • Set Design & Construction
  • Scenic Painting
  • Stage Management
  • Lighting Design, Programming & Operation
  • Costume Design & Construction
  • Sound Design & Operation
  • Publicity & House Management
  • Prop Design and Construction

Some of these fields will be addressed as units of study including hands-on training, written assessments and authentic, project-based assessments.  Other fields will be addressed through observation of experienced Irvine High students as well as industry professionals.

§ = Students will be expected to spend additional hours beyond the regular class time.  Approximately 12 hours of extra-curricular time will be required each semester for observation and work experience.


§ ADVANCED TECHNICAL THEATRE

Interview/Work Sample Required
Credit: 5 units per semester     
Format: 1  year alternating block
Level of Difficulty: CP, D
Advanced Technical Theatre students serve as designers and leaders of the production teams for the three major stage productions (fall play, musical, spring showcase).  Students choose an area of specialty (lighting, sound, costumes, etc.) and create the designs for the production.  Students will develop their skills through the execution of the full design process from script analysis to research, sketches, design pitches, budgeting, and drafting/building/programming to bringing designs to completion for a stage production.  A high level of commitment and self-direction is required to ensure the success of the production.  Time commitment outside of the class meeting time varies based on the demands of the student's chosen specialty.  Those specialties requiring a significant number of hours in rehearsal and performance will earn the student additional credit in the Play Production course.
§ = Students will be expected to spend additional hours beyond the regular class time.    


§ PLAY PRODUCTION

Audition or Interview Required; Director Approval Required
Credit: Variable    
Format: Variable
Level of Difficulty: NC, D    

Play Production forms the performing unit for the after-school plays and musicals presented at Irvine High School. This production class is intended for the student actors, stage crew, production managers, and box office personnel: all of whom are intensely involved with producing a theatrical show for public performance.
There will be at least one play or musical produced in each year. All participants must audition/interview with the director. Each student must also meet the "C" average grade requirement prior to the audition. Upon selection as an actor or member of the production crew, the student will automatically be enrolled in Play Production. *(Note: students will not pre-enroll prior to the audition date). All rehearsals and production duties will be held after school. A student will earn one unit of credit for each 36 hours of work completed. A maximum of five units may be earned in a semester.  
Upon completion of the course, the student will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate appropriate performance skills pertaining to acting techniques or production assignments.
  2. Analyze and interpret the play script.
  3. Produce a play/musical for public performance.

§ = Students will be expected to spend additional hours beyond the regular class time.


THEATRE - INDEPENDENT STUDY

Teacher Approval Required
Credit: Variable     
Format: Variable
Level of Difficulty: NC, D    

Independent Study is designed to allow students to pursue learning goals which interest them, but which are NOT part of the regular course offerings. Prior to registration, the student and his supervising teacher complete a formal agreement using the Request for Independent Study Credit form. The contract will specify the objectives of the activity, the resources required to accomplish the objectives, and a plan for evaluation of the work. Such projects require approval of the supervising teacher, the teacher advisor, department coordinator, parent and principal. The forms are available from Counselors or department coordinators.

 

Physical Education and Athletics

The high correlation between positive body image and positive self-image and between physical health and mental dexterity is well documented. Physical Education offers each student an opportunity to experience success, to demonstrate measurable progress at his own speed, to understand the function of major body systems, and to learn sound health practices. We seek a balance between the development of motor skills, and the development of skills in lifetime sports activities.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION POLICIES

Physical Education is required for all ninth grade students. All freshmen will be required to take Frosh PE for the entire year, except when they are scheduled into a semester team sport.  A second year of P.E. is required before graduation (20 credits). In general, the Physical Education classes are one quarter in length. All courses are offered as variable credit, which is dependent on student participation.
The Physical Education staff recommends the broadest possible experiences within the elective program for each student.
In any given semester period, a student may enroll in no more than 2 physical activity classes (as defined above).
Team Sports, Pep Squad, Color Guard, and Marching Band may be taken for P.E. credit. However, freshmen participating in Marching Band, or Dance Tech 1 must also enroll in a regular P.E. class.
Students participating in athletics will be enrolled in team sports period 4.
Out-Of-Season Sports (OSS) is a 4th period class for athletes entering and exiting seasonal team sports. Non-athletes will not be scheduled into this class.

FROSH PHYSICAL EDUCATION

All 9th graders, except those in team sports, will be enrolled in Frosh P.E.  This class, in keeping with the California State Standards for physical education, will provide opportunities for freshmen to participate in a wide variety of individual and dual-sport activities which may include: racquet sports (tennis, badminton, and pickleball), yoga, fitness, swimming, volleyball, basketball, and other alternate sport activities.

CALIFORNIA PHYSICAL FITNESS TEST

Every March, our students in grade nine will participate in the California Physical Fitness Test.  This health-related fitness test is intended to help students acquire lifelong habits of regular physical activity.  The fitness test includes activities for the six standards of fitness, including (1) aerobic capacity, (2) body composition, (3) abdominal strength and endurance, (4) trunk extension strength and flexibility, (5) upper body strength and endurance, and (6) flexibility.  There are two or three options for most fitness areas so that all students, including those with special needs, have the maximum opportunity to participate.  Two levels have been established to evaluate and report performance for each fitness area; (a) in the Healthy Fitness Zone and (b) needs improvement.  The desired performance goal for each test option is the Healthy Fitness Zone, which represents a level of fitness that offers some protection against the diseases resulting from physical inactivity.  Students must be in the Healthy Fitness Zone in at least five of the six standards.  If a student does not meet the standard in five or more of the six standards, state law requires that student to be enrolled in a physical education course sophomore year until the student retakes the California Physical Fitness Test in the spring and meets the criteria.

 

Science

PATHWAYS IN SCIENCE

Science Pathways

LIFE SCIENCE

Recommended Placement: Sophomore standing or higher
Credit: 5 units    
Format: 1 semester alt. block
Level of Difficulty: NC    

Life Science is designed to give students experiences in the basics of biology. Students will learn how to apply the scientific Method, use microscopes, become familiar with both plant and animal cells, learn the phases of cellular division, study basic molecular genetics, understand the importance of both photosynthesis and cellular respiration, and study ecology and evolutionary biology. Life Science will use a lab manual to reinforce organization and act as an advanced organizer for future assignments. This course is not available to students who have passed either semester of Biology.


CONSUMER CHEMISTRY

Recommended Placement: Sophomore standing or higher
Credit: 5 units    
Format: 1 semester alt. block
Level of Difficulty: NC     

Chemistry is a science every person comes into contact with daily. This course is designed to familiarize the student with those points of daily contact. After an introduction to the basic principles in chemistry, topics include: measurement and conversion; matter and its properties, composition and changes; atomic theory; gas laws; acids and bases; chemistry in the home.  This course is not available to students who have passed either semester of Chemistry.  


COLLEGE PREP SCIENCE CLASSES

NEXT GENERATION BIOLOGY A/B

Credit: 10 units
Format: 1 year alt. block
Level of Difficulty: CP, M        

Next Gen Biology is a laboratory science class that is centered around biology, meets all the NGSS science topics, yet it incorporates other science disciplines when appropriate.  Next Gen Biology will develop critical thinking skills necessary for science, essential science laboratory skills, an understanding of how models are used in science and scientific knowledge guided by the California High School NGSS Framework.  Students will build upon previous experiences and use new experiences to explain phenomena of living organisms and relevant interactions with Earth.  Next Gen Biology is arranged around four areas:  Structure and Function of living things, Genetics, Evolution, and Ecology.  Additionally, students will create laboratory reports, build models, and/or create projects integrating technology to form content skills.  


HONORS NEXT GENERATION BIOLOGY A/B

Credit: 10 units    
Format: 1 year alt. block
Level of Difficulty: CP, D        

Honors Next Gen Biology is an advanced version of the Next Gen Biology course designed to challenge learners who have demonstrated aptitude in science, and are also genuinely interested in understanding the inner workings of the natural world. Honors level students have demonstrated strong reading, writing, and speaking. This course delves deeper into the scientific concepts than the college prep version, the content will be taught at a more accelerated rate, and labs and tests will include more in-depth questions and require comprehensive responses.


NEXT GENERATION CHEMISTRY A/B

Credit: 10 units
Format: 1-year alt. block
Level of Difficulty: CP

Next Generation Chemistry is a laboratory science course, which allows students to explore and experience how chemistry is relevant to their everyday life.  The course will be guided by the California High School NGSS Framework and will center around five areas: heat flow, patterns within the periodic table, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, and equilibrium systems. As students explore these areas, they will have the opportunity to collaborate with their peers through hands on inquiry based laboratory work.


HONORS NEXT GENERATION CHEMISTRY A/B

Credit: 10 units
Format: 1-year alt. block
Level of Difficulty: CP, D

Honors Next Generation Chemistry is an advanced level of the Next Generation Chemistry course designed to challenge students who have demonstrated interest in science.  This course will help students develop a deeper understanding of the content and gain critical thinking skills that they will continue to use in high school and college. The content will be taught at an accelerated rate, and the laboratory experiments and tests will be designed to elicit in-depth and comprehensive responses from students.


NEXT GENERATION PHYSICS A/B

Credit: 10 units    
Format: 1 year alt. block
Level of Difficulty: CP, D    

In this course, students will study major topics in physics outlined by the California Science Framework/ NGSS which includes: motion, forces, conservation of energy, conservation of momentum, electromagnetism, waves, and astronomy. This course satisfies the “d” requirement for laboratory science for admission to UC schools. This course has a strong emphasis on having students demonstrate mathematical and conceptual understanding through problem solving, laboratory investigations and projects.


ADVANCED COLLEGE PREP SCIENCE CLASSES

ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY 1 A/B

Students in the Class of 2022 and beyond must have completed or be concurrently enrolled in NextGen Physics or AP Physics
Credit: 10 units per year     
Format: 2 years alt. block
Level of Difficulty: CP, R    

The course is designed to give students an understanding of the structure and function of the systems of the human body and their interrelationships. Human physiology systems will provide the basic framework from which students will learn about vital human life processes such as respiration, digestion, circulation, immune responses, and reproduction. The course has been structured to be lab based with many of the laboratory exercises simulating the work of various categories of health professionals. Laboratory activities include dissection of both comparative animal organs as well as the cat anatomy in its entirety. This course is specifically designed for students who have interests in the medical field, including veterinary medicine, as well as those students who desire a more advanced science course in preparation for college work. The course meets the University of California requirements for laboratory science. Students must pass first semester to enroll in second semester.


ADVANCED PLACEMENT BIOLOGY A/B

Students in the Class of 2022 and beyond must have completed or be concurrently enrolled in NextGen Physics or AP Physics. 
Credit: 10 units     
Format: 1 year alt. block
Level of Difficulty: CP, R    

AP Biology is a second year Biology course, equivalent to the first semester of college biology. The course prepares students to take the Advanced Placement Biology Exam, through which college credits may be earned. The major content areas of the course are molecular and cellular biology, genetics, evolution, organism biology and population biology.
 


ADVANCED PLACEMENT CHEMISTRY A/B

Students in the Class of 2022 and beyond must have completed or be concurrently enrolled in NextGen Physics or AP Physics
Credit: 10 units     
Format: 1 year alt. block
Level of Difficulty: CP, R     
AP Chemistry is a second year Chemistry course, equivalent to the first semester of College Chemistry. The Advanced Placement Exam will be given in May for the students to earn college credits. Concepts introduced in Chemistry will be developed in greater detail in AP Chemistry. These include gas laws, stoichiometry, equilibrium, acids and bases, quantum theory, bonding, oxidation-reduction, thermodynamics, kinetics, and electrochemistry, organic chemistry and nuclear chemistry will also be explored.


ADVANCED PLACEMENT ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE A/B

Students in the Class of 2022 and beyond must have completed or be concurrently enrolled in NextGen Physics or AP Physics
Credit: 10 units     
Format: 1 year alt. block
Level of Difficulty: CP, R     

AP Environmental Science is an advanced placement science course equivalent to the first semester of college environmental science/studies. The course prepares students to take the Advanced Placement Environmental Sciences Exam, through which college credits may be earned. The major content areas of the course are Earth’s systems and resources, global change, energy resources and consumption, land and water use, and pollution. Upon completion of this course, students will better comprehend the intricacies of Earth’s living and nonliving dynamic processes and human impact upon them, as well as environmental legislation.


ADVANCED PLACEMENT PHYSICS 1 A/B

Credit: 10 units
Format: 1 year alt. block
Level of Difficulty: CP,R    

In this college-level algebra-based physics course, students will study major topics in physics outlined by College Board AP Physics 1 including: motion, forces, simple harmonic motion, conservation of energy, conservation of momentum, rotational motion, electrostatics, circuits, electromagnetism and waves. T

After completing this course, students will be able to...

  • Demonstrate science processing skills through making observations, taking measurements, analyzing data and drawing conclusions based on data.
  • Communicate mathematical and conceptual understanding of physics through solving physics problems in written form and through the use of diagrams, models, tables, graphs and symbols.
  • Use appropriate technology to collect, interpret, organize, and present information.
  • Demonstrate problem solving, critical thinking and engineering skills through open-ended laboratory experiments and projects.

Social Science

MODERN WORLD HISTORY

Sophomore requirement
Credit: 10 units
Format: 1 semester solid block
Level of Difficulty: CP
Modern World History is a UC-approved, college-prep solid-block semester course. Students will study major turning points that shaped the modern world, from the late eighteenth century through the present, including the cause and course of the two world wars. They will trace the rise of democratic ideas and develop an understanding of the historical roots of current world issues, especially as they pertain to international relations. They will also draw inferences from the American experience that democratic ideals are often achieved at a high price, remain vulnerable, and are not practiced everywhere in the world. Students will develop an understanding of current world issues and relate them to their historical, geographic, political, economic, and cultural contexts. As part of this course, students will consider multiple accounts of events in order to understand international relations from a variety of perspectives.
Topics may include the following:

  1. The moral and ethical principles in ancient Greek and Roman philosophy, in Judaism, and in Christianity to the development of Western political thought.
  2. The Glorious Revolution of England, the American Revolution, and the French Revolution and their enduring effects worldwide on the political expectations for self-government and individual liberty.
  3. The effects of the Industrial Revolution in England, France, Germany, Japan, and the United States.
  4. The patterns of global change in the era of New Imperialism in at least two of the following regions or countries: Africa, Southeast Asia, China, India, Latin America, and the Philippines.
  5. The causes and effects of the First World War.
  6. The rise of totalitarian governments after World War I.
  7. The causes and consequences of World War II.
  8. The international developments in the post–World War II world.
  9. Nation-building in the contemporary world in at least two of the following regions or countries: the Middle East, Africa, Mexico and other parts of Latin America, and China.
  10. The integration of countries into the world economy and the information, technological, and communications revolutions (e.g., television, satellites, computers).

HONORS MODERN WORLD HISTORY

Placement based on Middle School Teacher Recommendation
Credit: 10 units
Format: 1 semester solid block
Level of Difficulty: CP, R

Honors Modern World History is a more challenging version of the course previously described.  It includes more emphasis on writing and higher level thinking skills.


ADVANCED PLACEMENT EUROPEAN HISTORY

Credit: 10 units
Format: 1 year, alternating block
Level of difficulty: CP, R

The AP European History course is designed by the College Board to focus less on history content and more on students developing the critical thinking skills used by historians, with the goal of creating “apprentice historians” who are able to develop deeper understanding of critical developments in European history.  Consequently, there is greater emphasis on analysis of primary and secondary documents and source materials.  The course is designed to prepare students for the national Advanced Placement exam in May of each year.

The course will cover 4 historical periods: 1450-1648, 1648-1815, 1815-1914, and 1914 to the present.  The course is also structured around the following themes in European history: interaction of Europe and the world; poverty and prosperity; objective knowledge and subjective visions; states and other institutions of power; and the individual and society.  Students are required to demonstrate the following historical thinking skills: chronological reasoning, comparison and contextualization, crafting historical arguments from historical evidence, and historical interpretation of synthesis.


UNITED STATES HISTORY

Junior requirement
Credit: 10 units
Format: 1 semester solid block
Level of Difficulty: CP

The purpose of U.S. History is to provide students a general background in American History with an emphasis on 20th Century events and developments. This course covers the following topics:

  • Forging a New Nation, 1765-1900
  • Roots of a Modern Nation, 1900-1920
  • The “Roaring ‘20’s”
  • Economic Crisis and New Deal, 1929-1941
  • World War II, 1941-1945
  • The Cold War, 1945-1990
  • Equality and Social Reform 1954-1976
  • The Vietnam Era, 1960-1976
  • The New Conservatism, 1976-1990
  • Conservation through 21st Century,  1990 -  present

ADVANCED PLACEMENT UNITED STATES HISTORY

Credit: 10 units
Format: 1 year alt. block
Level of Difficulty: CP, R

Advanced Placement U.S. History is intended to provide intensive study of American History from pre-colonial to recent times. This course is intended to meet the needs of students interested in advanced study and to provide preparation for the Advanced Placement test. Critical thinking, historical interpretation, and writing skills will be emphasized. Upon completion of the course, the student will be able to:

  1. Read, interpret, and criticize historical works.
  2. Identify assumptions which underlie various historical interpretations.
  3. Analyze and discuss in writing significant themes in United States history.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT AMERICAN
GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS/ HONORS ECONOMICS

Credit: 10
Format: 1 year alt. block
Level of Difficulty: CP, R

This course presents American Government subject matter that is representative of what a university freshman would typically experience in the Political Science discipline. This course will help students to develop their own political ideas and the skills necessary to participate in a democratic society. This course will also prepare students for the advanced placement exam in American Government and Politics. In addition, this course meets state requirements for Economics.

The following topics will be examined through various analytical perspectives, left, center, and right:

  1. Democratic theory and how that theory applies to the current and past political environments.
  2. The political process.
  3. Linkage Institutions such as elections, political parties, special interest groups and the media.
  4. The major policy making institutions of the national government.
  5. Public policy-making.
  6. Civil Rights and Civil Liberties

Students will also study economic theory and political economy. This study will focus on essential economic concepts while emphasizing the impact that economics and government have on each other. More specifically, students will see important connections between market events, our legal framework and our political system.

Activities that may be included in the course include:

  1. Individual research and writing.
  2. Collaborative research and writing.
  3. Oral presentation in groups and as individuals.
  4. Regular in-class discussions
  5. Group debates on various topics.

AMERICAN POLITICAL ECONOMY

Senior requirement
Credit: 10 units
Format: 1 semester solid block
Level of Difficulty: CP

This is an integrated, college preparatory course which meets state and district requirements for the study of American Government and Economics. Students of this course will study the influence of governmental and legal institutions on markets and on individual economic decisions. By exposing them to the U.S. political economy, students will see important connections between market events, our legal framework and our political system.

Building from the historical context of two revolutions, the American and the Industrial Revolution, and two constitutions, The Articles of Confederation and the U.S. Constitution, this course examines the impact of politics on economic policy and, conversely, the impact of the economy on the political process. During this course students will explore the significance of our civil liberties and civil rights; they will examine several economic functions of the government, and will become familiar with several major American political ideologies.

Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Identify the political and economic values expressed in the Constitution.
  2. Compare and contrast political and market solutions to collective problems.
  3. Identify some political issues surrounding economic policy decisions.
  4. Explain the differences between regulation and deregulation, fiscal and monetary policy.
  5. Identify the role corporations and labor play in the national and international political economy.
  6. Identify how economics affects U.S. politics.
  7. Discuss events, develop informed opinions, and ask questions about the political-economic issues underlying those events.
  8. Comprehend how powerful political and economic forces affect their lives.
  9. Demonstrate an understanding of our Constitutional limits on government, the separation of powers, our system of checks and balances, the protection of individual rights and civil liberties, and present a familiarity with major Federal Court cases from throughout our history.

AP MACROECONOMICS

Recommended Placement: Junior or senior standing; completion of World and US History
Credit: 5 units
Format: 1 semester alternating block
Level of Difficulty: AP, R

AP Macroeconomics is a rigorous course designed to engage students in the most important concepts of Macroeconomics, similar to what a university freshman would experience in the Economics discipline.  The purpose of this AP course in macroeconomics is to give students a thorough understanding of the principles of economics that apply to an economic system as a whole.  The course places particular emphasis on the study of national income and price-level determination, and also develops students’ familiarity with economic performance measures, the financial sector, stabilization policies, economic growth, and international economics.


PSYCHOLOGY

Recommended Placement: Jr./Sr. standing; priority given to Seniors
Credit: 5 units
Format: 1 semester alt. block
Level of Difficulty: CP

CP Psychology is an 11th and 12th grade alternating course where  students will learn why we behave the way we do and the methods used by psychologists to study behavior.  the course encourages students to apply this knowledge to enhance their own lives. Specific topics include: Human Development, States of Consciousness and Social Psychology.  This course will lay the foundation either for a more rigorous learning environment like AP Psychology, a college major in psychology, or just for generating interest and understanding in yourself!  

Unit 1: Thinking Like a Psychologist (perspectives, ethics, and methods)

Unit 2: States of Consciousness (emotions, sleep, psychoactive drugs, stress, and mental illness)

Unit 3:  Human Development (parenting and attachment styles, morality, adolescence, gender roles, and identity)

Unit 4: Social Psychology (biases, conformity, relationships, and cultural infliences)


AP PSYCHOLOGY

Recommended Placement: Jr./Sr. standing; priority given to Seniors
Credit: 5 units
Format: 1 year alt. block
Level of Difficulty: CP, R

Psychology encompasses nine College Board aligned units of study designed to introduce students to systemic and scientific study of behavior and mental process of human beings and animals.  Through inquiry-based investigations, students will explore concepts like sensation and perception, learning and cognition, motivation, abnormal behavior, and much more.  Students can expect weekly reading and writing assignments from the text, and/or supplemental readings.  Assignments will consist of analyzing, synthesizing, and evaluating these texts.  Classwork will consist of lecture, discussion, and debates.  

Some of the topics covered: 

  • Scientific Foundations of Psychology
  • Biological Bases of Behavior
  • Sensation and Perception
  • Learning
  • Cognitive Psychology
  • Developmental Psychology
  • Motivation, Emotion, and Personality
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Social Psychology

ADULT LIVING

Recommended Placement: Jr./Sr. standing; priority given to Seniors
Credit: 5 units
Format: 1 semester alt. block
Level of Difficulty: NC

Adult Living is rooted in Dave Ramsey’s Foundations in Personal Finance curriculum.   Foundations in Personal Finance meets the national standards developed and written by the JumpStart Coalition for Personal Financial Literacy.  They are taught simple saving habits that can lead them to be financially independent and live debt free. The curriculum helps to enable students to confidently discuss money issues and plan for their own financial future.
In addition to the financial aspects of the course other topics that are covered include:

  1. Goal Setting
  2. Career Exploration
  3. Resumes and Cover Letters
  4. Professional Dress
  5. Marital Responsibilities

Main Units:

  1. Saving and Investing
    • Basic reasons to save money; compound interest; diversification; benefits of long and short term investing using tax-favored plans
  2. Credit and Debt
    • Debunk the myths associated with debt and how to avoid it.  Show how debt is marketed to young people.  Consumer awareness; credit bureaus; collection practices.
  3. Financial Responsibility and Money Management
    • Budgeting 101—creating and living on a written budget; bargain shopping; explore how men and women view money differently.
  4. Insurance/Risk Management and Income/Careers
    • Career choices; taxes (personal and governmental); examine the many types of insurance and their purpose; real estate—buying, selling, and renting process, financing and costs associated with home ownership and renting.

HISTORY IN FILM

Recommended Placement: Junior/Senior standing
College Prep elective (Pending UC/CSU approval)
Length: 1 semester, alternating

Today’s youth are a visual learning generation, often learning about the past through theatrical films.  However, how accurate is the history depicted in these movies?  Films use historical events or personalities but combine them with fictional dialogue or characters.  (Facts + fiction = “Faction”) The purpose of this course is to introduce students to examine critically the accuracy of the historical events or personalities portrayed in these films.  Films screened will include documentaries as well as theatrical films, including classics of the cinema and foreign films.  There will also be readings from books, scholarly journals, and newspapers.  A possible final project will have students seeing a film on their own and providing a written critique of the film, applying techniques and concepts used in the course.

NOTE: THIS COURSE CANNOT BE USED TO REPLACE A REQUIRED COURSE IN SOCIAL SCIENCE

Possible themes to be covered in the course include:

  • War, including individual wars
  • American politics or the presidency
  • Civil Rights Movement
  • Biographic films
  • The Holocaust
  • The Press
  • American Slavery
  • Depiction of American enemies in wars
  • The Cold War
  • The Space Race
  • The Great Depression
  • Portrayal of Women through the decades
  • Ethnic experiences
  • Labor movements
  • Focus on specific decades

Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:

  • Critically evaluate the historical content and context of films
  • Understand historical events depicted in popular film, their causes and effect
  • Write informed evaluations of both events and films
  • Apply critical studies to other films, television presentations and other current media
  • Distinguish historical fact vs. historical fabrication
  • Explain how and why fabrication(s) is used in films
  • Distinguish how filmmakers’ perspectives influence their work

Visual Arts/ CTE


INTRODUCTION TO ART F/S

Credit: 5 units per semester    
Format: 1 semester each; alt. block
Level of Difficulty: CP

Introduction to Art is designed to introduce the basic art elements and principles as they apply to the four components of art education:  Art History, Art Expression/Production, Aesthetic Analysis, and Art Criticism.  Introduction to Art is intended to provide introductory experiences through the use of a variety of media and techniques that have been utilized by various cultures throughout history.  These may include Drawing, Painting, Printmaking, Graphics, Ceramics, Sculpture, Design, Lettering, Handcrafts, Art History, and Art Appreciation.  This class will also explore the many possible career choices in the field of art.  Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Use the art elements and principles to produce works of art.
  2. Develop aesthetic judgment.
  3. Employ mathematical skills related to proportion and scale.
  4. Employ organizational skills to complete a project on time.
  5. Effectively collaborate with others on group projects.
  6. Demonstrate complex thinking on a written final exam covering related vocabulary, terminology, and visual arts concepts.  

PAINTING & DRAWING F/S

Credit: 5 units per semester    
Format: 1 semester each; alt. block
Level of Difficulty: CP
    

This fundamental course is designed for students wishing to  pursue their interest in painting and drawing. Students work with various media, develop skills with a variety of materials, tools and techniques. Experiences with graphite,  charcoal, pen and ink, colored pencils, watercolor, tempera, are offered. Upon completion of the course, the student will have completed exercises in the following areas:

  1. Principles of good composition
  2. One- and two-pt. perspective
  3. Drawings using gesture, contour and shading
  4. Observational drawing practice
  5. Contrast and Value studies
  6. Color theory study
  7. In class critiques of the work of their peers
  8. Study and analysis of historical artwork

ADVANCED DRAWING and PAINTING A/B

(Meets G and F requirements for UC)    
Recommended Placement: A passing grade for both semesters of Drawing and Painting. (or teacher approval)
Credit: 10 units
Level of Difficulty: CP, M
Format: 1 year alt

Course Description
An advanced course intended to give the student a variety of art experiences and develop personal expression and creativity. Students will expand on their knowledge of the application of the elements and principles of design while introducing students to various art media and techniques. Students work toward improving craftsmanship and building a portfolio of their study in art. The study of art history will continue through participation in lectures and discussion of fine art reproductions.

Course Objectives
The student will:

  1. Express original ideas through an understanding of the elements of art and principles of design, as verified by the development and completion of assignments.
  2. Develop the skills necessary to work with a variety of art media in the development and completion of two-dimensional art projects. Additional emphasis will be on good craftsmanship, as verified by completed projects.
  3. Develop a historical perspective in art by recognizing varying individual and cultural themes and styles, as verified by completed assignments.
  4. Develop the ability to make informed aesthetic judgments about works of art, nature, and objects in the total environment.
  5. Demonstrate understanding and use of vocabulary and terminology associated with art as verified by observation, assignments and tests.
  6. Demonstrate safe and proper use and care of tools and materials, and equipment as verified by teacher observation.
  7. Read instructional materials related to art, write and make mathematical computations necessary in assigned activities, as verified by projects.
  8. Students will compare and contrast, evaluate, and discuss peers artwork in a critique format.
  9. Participate and display original art work in the school art show.

AP Studio Art: Drawing A/B

(Meets G and F requirements for UC)
Recommended Placement: A passing grade for both semesters of Advanced Drawing and Painting. (or teacher approval).  Students must submit an application and portfolio. ‘C’ or better required 1st semester to continue to 2nd semester.
Credit: 10 units
Level of Difficulty: CP, R
Format: 1 year alt or Semester

Course Description
This is an intensive drawing and painting course for students to work toward the development of a comprehensive  portfolio which will demonstrate three major components: quality, concentration, and breadth. Portfolios are submitted to the college board in May. Students will expand on their knowledge of the application of the elements and principles of design while working with a variety of media, including pastel, pencil, acrylics, or watercolor. The study of art history will continue through participation in lectures and discussion of fine art reproductions. Discussions will also include conversations about aesthetic concepts and art criticism.

Course Objectives
The student will:

  1. Express original ideas through an understanding of the elements of art and principles of design, as verified by the development and completion of assignments.
  2. Demonstrate advanced skills necessary to work independently with a variety of art media in the development and completion of two dimensional art projects. Additional emphasis will be on good craftsmanship, as verified by completed projects.
  3. Develop the ability to make informed aesthetic judgments about works of art, nature, and objects in the total environment.
  4. Read instructional materials related to art, write and make mathematical computations necessary in assigned activities, as verified by projects.
  5. Participate and display original art work in the school art show.
  6. Develop a portfolio suitable for submission to the College Board by the 1st week of May.
  7. Photograph and digitally edit photos of personal artwork.

CERAMICS F/S    

Credit: 5 credits; Alternating Block
Level of Difficulty: CP, M

Course Description
A course intended to develop personal expression and creativity using the medium of ceramics. There is an emphasis on the application of the elements and principles of design. Students work toward learning techniques and improving craftsmanship and understanding of process through the completion of teacher guided projects. Some projects will reference the history of art.

Course Objectives
The student will:

  1. Express original ideas through an understanding of the elements of art and principles of design, as verified by the development and completion of assignments.
  2. Develop the skills necessary to work with ceramic media in the development and completion of three-dimensional art projects. (Hand building, throwing on the potter's wheel, glazing) Additional emphasis will be on good craftsmanship, as verified by completed projects.
  3. Develop a historical perspective in ceramics by investigating written materials; slides; videos; illustrations on individual styles; and cultural themes, as verified by completed written assignments and art projects.
  4. Develop the ability to make informed aesthetic judgments about works of art, nature, and objects in the total environment, as verified by teacher observation.
  5. Demonstrate understanding and use of vocabulary and terminology associated with ceramic art as verified by observation, assignments and tests.
  6. Demonstrate safe and proper use and care of tools and materials, and equipment as verified by teacher observation.
  7. Read instructional materials related to fine art ceramics, write and make simple mathematical computations necessary in assigned activities, as verified by projects.
  8. Participate and display original art work in the school art show.

ADVANCED CERAMICS F/S

Recommended Placement: Two Semesters of Ceramics
Credit: 5 credits
Level of Difficulty: CP
Format: 1 semester, Alternating Block

Course Description:
Intended to improve skills and develop creative expression in both functional and nonfunctional ceramic projects. Students work toward learning/improving techniques, and craftsmanship.  Students will develop an understanding of processes of both traditional and modern forms and techniques and make comparisons.  Students will learn how to photograph their work and upload into the digital classroom. Students will critiques themselves and others using the elements and principles of design. Time management skills are crucial.

Course Objectives:
The student will:

  1. Express original ideas through an understanding of the elements of art and principles of design, as verified by the development and completion of assignments.
  2. Improve the skills necessary to work with ceramic media in the development and completion of three-dimensional art projects. (Hand building, throwing on the potter's wheel, glazing and finishing techniques) Additional emphasis will be on good craftsmanship, as verified by completed projects.
  3. Increase understanding of historical perspectives in ceramics by investigating written materials; slides; videos; illustrations on individual styles; and cultural themes as verified by completed written assignments and art projects.
  4. Develop the ability to make informed aesthetic judgments about works of art, nature, and objects in the total environment, as verified by teacher observation.
  5. Demonstrate understanding and use of vocabulary and terminology associated with ceramic art as verified by observation, assignments and tests.
  6. Demonstrate safe and proper use and care of tools and materials, and equipment as verified by teacher observation.
  7. Participate in monthly in class critiques and presentations.
  8. Students will use the elements and principles to make positive comment about each other’s work and post them to the digital classroom.
  9. Work safely and appropriately using online using Edmodo, Aeries, and other websites.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT 3D DESIGN

(Meets G and F requirements for UC)    
Recommended Placement: A passing grade in two or more semesters of Ceramics and teacher approval.
Credit: 10 units
Level of Difficulty: CP, R
Format: 1 year alt.

Course Description:
This class is an intensive challenge to build a portfolio for submission to the College Board or to create a professional artist website. Students will use the internet to read instructions for a summer assignment and 12 breadth projects and 8 pieces on a theme of their own choosing. Students must be ready to working independently a sustainable amount of time. Students must be capable for asking for help, completing research, taking and applying criticism before entering the class.
The AP 3D Design portfolio can include many different kinds of three dimensional works.
Course Objectives:
The student will:

  1. Use the internet to read instructions for the summer assignment.
  2. Express original ideas through an understanding of the elements of art and principles of design, as verified by the development and completion of assignments
  3. Use advance skills necessary to work independently with a variety of art media in the development and completion of two dimensional art projects. Additional emphasis will be on good craftsmanship, as verified by completed projects.
  4. Develop a historical perspective in art by recognizing varying individual and cultural themes and styles, as verified by completed assignments.
  5. Develop the ability to make informed aesthetic judgments about works of art, nature, and objects in the total environment, as verified by teacher observation.
  6. Demonstrate understanding and use of vocabulary and terminology associated with art as verified by observation, assignments and tests.
  7. Read instructional materials online related to art assignments write and make simple mathematical computations necessary in assigned activities, as verified by projects.
  8. Participate and display original art work in the school art show.
  9. Submit a portfolio to the College Board or create an artist website.
  10. Photograph artwork, edit, and upload artwork in the appropriate format.
  11. Demonstrate an understanding of copyright laws as it pertains to art and digital imagery.
  12. Work safely and appropriately using online using Edmodo, Aeries, and other websites.

AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY MLR 1 F/S

Credit: 5 variable units    
Format: 1 semester alt. block; MLR 1 F or S can be taken in any order.
Level of Difficulty: CP

The curriculum is aligned to the CA CTE Model Curriculum Standards and Career Ready Standards for the Sector Transportation and Systems Diagnostics, Service & Repair career pathway.

Auto MLR (Maintenance and Light Repair) I is designed as a beginning automotive mechanic course that introduces students to automobile service and repair, shop safety, engine repair, automatic transmissions and transaxles, manual drive train and axles, suspension and steering, brakes, electrical and electronic systems, heating and air conditioning, and engine performance. This is the first course in a 2-course sequence that prepares students for the Maintenance and Light Repair (MLR) ASE Student Certification test. Students will be introduced to automotive technology concepts in the classroom and be provided lab-based hands-on maintenance and repair experience.  This course will also provide students with the opportunity to apply and extend concepts studied in their math and science classes (related to algebra, basic arithmetic, physics, and electrical, computer, and chemical sciences) to the automotive technology industry. 


AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY MLR 2 F/S

Recommended Placement: Passing grades in Automotive Technology MLR I
Credit: 5 variable units
Format: 1 semester alt. block; MLR 2 F or S can be taken in any order
Level of Difficulty: CP

The curriculum is aligned to the CA CTE Model Curriculum Standards and Career Ready Standards for the Sector Transportation and Systems Diagnostics, Service & Repair career pathway.

Auto MLR (Maintenance and Light Repair) II is designed as the second of a two course sequence that continues instruction in automobile service and repair, shop safety, engine repair, automatic transmissions and transaxles, manual drive train and axles, suspension and steering, brakes, electrical and electronic systems, heating and air conditioning, and engine performance.  After completion of this course, students will be prepared for an internship or entry level position in today’s automotive services industry, beginning ASE (Automotive Service Excellence) certification, and will have completed the NATEF (National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation) MLR curriculum. This course will also provide students with the opportunity to apply and extend concepts studied in their math and science classes (related to algebra, basic arithmetic, physics, and electrical, computer, and chemical sciences) to the automotive technology industry.  


ADVANCED AUTO A/B

Recommended Placement: Passing grades in Automotive Tech MLR 1 and Automotive Tech MLR 2
Credit: 5 variable units
Format: 1 semester alt. block
Level of Difficulty: CP

The curriculum is aligned to the CA CTE Model Curriculum Standards and Career Ready Standards for the Sector Transportation and Systems Diagnostics, Service & Repair career pathway.

Advanced Auto is a 1 year course that requires successful completion of MLR 1 and MLR 2. In this class students will be rebuilding and blueprinting engines, performing major repairs on vehicles, welding, and working on metal fabrication.


TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION INDEPENDENT STUDY

Instructor Approval Required
Format: Variable
Credit: Variable    
Level of Difficulty: NC, M
Independent Study is designed to allow students to pursue learning goals which interest them, but which are NOT part of the regular course offerings. Prior to registration, the student and his  supervising teacher complete a formal agreement using the Request for Independent Study Credit form. The contract will specify the objectives of the activity, the resources required to accomplish the objectives, and a plan for evaluation of the work. Such projects require approval of the supervising teacher, the teacher advisor, Department Coordinator, parent and Principal. The forms are available from Counselors or Department Coordinators


KEYBOARDING

Credit: 5 units    
Format: 1 semester alt. block
Level of Difficulty: NC     

Designed for students who cannot type accurately by touch or who are uncomfortable using computers, this course will cover the basics of keyboarding and word processing applications.  The first nine weeks will be centered on learning or re-learning the keyboard by touch, proofreading, error correction and speed on the keyboard.  The second quarter will focus on using Microsoft Word and word processing techniques to create business applications such as letters, memos, and manuscripts.  
Upon completion of the course students will be able to:
Keyboard at a minimum rate of 25 wpm by touch.
Use correct fingering and other typing techniques.
Proofread and edit documents.
Produce correctly formatted business letters and manuscripts.


CAREER EXPLORATION & COMPUTER APPLICATIONS

Recommended Placement: Typing speed of 25 wpm
Credit:  5 units
Format: 1 semester alt. block
Level of Difficulty:  NC

The preparation of students for the business world, whether directly after high school or upon finishing college, is an invaluable and often overlooked part of transitioning into the adult world.  CECA is designed to introduce many of the concepts and skills needed to be successful.
CECA explores:
Potential career interests, including personality compatibility, education and future outlook
Finding a job in a career field; including preparation,  jobs search resources, applications, resume writing, and interviewing skills
Common computer business applications, including MS Word and MS Excel
The stock market and financial investments
Impact of current events on careers and industry
Employee vs ownership; including business structures, advantages and disadvantages
Planning a small business
Tax responsibilities (Individual income tax, if so you might want to use that in the bullet.


VIRTUAL ENTERPRISE A/B

Credits: 10 credits
Grade Level: 9 -12
Length: One year, alternating (Students must enroll in both semesters, A and B)
Level of Difficulty: CP, R

The curriculum is aligned to the CA CTE Model Curriculum Standards and Career Ready Standards for the Sector Marketing Sales and Service and Entrepreneurship career pathway.

In this course, students will create and operate a virtual business modeled under the US Network of Virtual Enterprises International. “A Virtual Enterprise is a simulated business that is set up and run by students to prepare them for working in the real business environment. With the guidance of a teacher (“consultant”) and real world business partners, the students determine the nature of their business, its products and services, its management and structure, and engage in the daily operations of running a business. Emphasis is placed on using current business software, communications, and the
Internet for business transactions. Students may participate in trade fair competitions organized through California Virtual Enterprise network. Refer to the CA Virtual Enterprise web site for more information, http://www.virtualenterprise.org.
Students will receive elective credit in Economics.


WEB SITE DESIGN & MANAGEMENT A/B

Credit: 5 units    
Format: 1 year alt. block
Level of Difficulty: NC     

The curriculum is aligned to the CA CTE Model Curriculum Standards and Career Ready Standards for the Sector Information and Communication Technologies and Software & Systems career pathway.

This course focuses on utilization of  various parts of the Internet, including World Wide Web, E-mail, FTP, Usenet, Telnet, and Gopher) development of a basic website, including HTML, CSS, Adobe Dreamweaver.
Objectives:

  • Students will learn and understand how the Internet works and how to utilize various resources available on the Internet
  • Students will learn how to apply web site concepts.
  • Students will learn how to utilize a web host.
  • Students will learn how to create web sites using HTML, CSS, and Dreamweaver.
  • Students will post websites on the Internet.
  • Students will use be introduced to a server, database, website relationship, including learning the basics of PHP, MySQL, and server software.

COMPUTER BUSINESS APPLICATIONS

Credit: 5 units    
Format: 1 semester alt. block
Level of Difficulty: NC         

This one semester course introduces computer terminology, hardware, and software related to the business environment. The focus of this course is on business productivity software applications and professional behavior in computing, including keyboarding word processing, spreadsheets, databases, presentation graphics, public speaking and business-oriented utilization of the Internet. Students will also explore potential career opportunities.


ADVANCED WEB SITE DESIGN & MANAGEMENT A/B

Recommended Placement:  Inter. Web Site Dev., Instructors Approval
Credit: 5 units    
Format: 1 semester alt. block
Level of Difficulty: NC     

The curriculum is aligned to the CA CTE Model Curriculum Standards and Career Ready Standards for the Sector Information and Communication Technologies and Software & Systems career pathway.    
This course will explore the use of web site development  techniques in a practical application. HTML and other web site concepts will be developed, utilized, and implemented. The class is responsible for the development and maintenance of the Irvine High School website.
Objectives:

  1. Students will learn how to apply web site concepts.
  2. Students will develop and maintain the school's web site.
  3. Students will develop communication skills with classmates, teachers, and staff members.
  4. Students will use their expertise as web site consultants for various groups and individuals.

INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING DESIGN A/B

Credits: 10
Grade Level: 9 -12
Length: One year, alternating
Level of Difficulty: CP, T

Recommended Placement: The course assumes no previous knowledge, however, math skills such as being able to solve equations, performing math operations with fractions and decimals, working with proportions, and some basic geometry knowledge are highly recommended.

A grade of 60% or higher is required to move to the second semester.
Any student who needs to repeat this course must repeat the entire year.  
Students may not enroll concurrently in IED and Principles of Engineering.

The curriculum is aligned to the CA CTE Model Curriculum Standards and Career Ready Standards for the Engineering and Architecture Industry Sector and Engineering Design career pathway.

The course of study includes:

· Engineering Design Process · Modeling · Sketching · Measurement, Statistics, and Applied Geometry · Career Exploration· Presentation Design and Delivery · Engineering Drawing Standards · CAD Solid Modeling · Reverse Engineering · Consumer Product Design Innovation · Marketing ·
Graphic Design Engineering · Engineering Ethics

Introduction to Engineering Design™ (IED) is a high school level course that is appropriate for 9th-12th grade students who are interested in learning design and engineering and skills through engaging hands-on activities. It is one of two foundation courses in the Project Lead The Way® (PLTW) high school engineering pathway.  The major focus of the IED course is to expose students to the design process, research and analysis, teamwork, communication methods, technical documentation, engineering standards, and the global and human impact of various engineering disciplines. IED gives students the opportunity to develop skills and understand course concepts through problem-based learning and hands-on activities.

In addition to learning 3D modeling using paper and drafting tools, students will use Autodesk Computer Aided Design (CAD) software to help them design solutions for proposed problems. Students will use state-of-the-art rapid prototyping technologies such as 3D printing and laser cutting to build their projects.  Students will develop problem-solving skills and apply their knowledge to create solutions to various challenges throughout the course.

Upon successfully completing this course with a 70% or better and concurrent enrollment in Math II or above, students will be eligible to enroll in Principles of Engineering.  


PRINCIPLES OF ENGINEERING A/B

Credits: 10
Grade Level: 9 -12
Length: One year, alternating
Level of Difficulty: CP, T
Recommended Placement:  Concurrent enrollment in Math II or higher.  Teacher recommendation.

A grade of 60% or higher is required to move to the second semester.
Any student who needs to repeat this course must repeat the entire year.  
Students may not enroll concurrently in Introduction to Engineering Design and Principles of Engineering.

The curriculum is aligned to the CA CTE Model Curriculum Standards and Career Ready Standards for the Engineering and Architecture Industry Sector and Engineering Design career pathway.

The course of study includes:

· Energy and Power · Six Simple Machines · Basic Electricity · Thermodynamics · Materials and Structures · Engineering Design Process · CAD Solid Modeling · Control Systems· Robotics · Statistics and Kinematics · Marketing · Graphic Design · Career Exploration · Engineering Ethics
 
Principles of Engineering™ (POE) is a high school-level survey course of engineering.  It is one of two foundation courses in the Project Lead The Way® (PLTW) high school engineering pathway.  This course will expose students to some of the major concepts that they will encounter in a post-secondary engineering course of study. This class focuses on problems that engage and challenge. Students explore a broad range of engineering topics, including mechanisms, the strength of structures and materials, and automation.  Students develop skills in problem solving, research, and design while learning strategies for design process documentation, collaboration, and presentation. POE gives students the opportunity to develop skills and understand course concepts through problem-based learning and hands-on activities.  

The course applies and develops secondary level knowledge and skills in mathematics, science and technology.  Students will be working with Autodesk Computer Aided Design (CAD) software, Vex robotics kits, Arduino, and state-of-the-art rapid prototyping technologies such as 3D printing and laser cutting to build their projects.  In this course, students will be
designing and creating machines and robots to demonstrate their understanding of the course curriculum.  In addition to creating design solutions on the CAD software, students will use it to perform structural analyses of their designs.
*Students do not need to complete Introduction to Engineering to enroll in this course.  Upon successful completion of this course (grade C or higher) students will be eligible to enroll in Aerospace Engineering.


AEROSPACE ENGINEERING A/B

Credits: 10
Grade Level: 10-12
Length: One year, alternating
Recommended Placement:  Completion of Principles of Engineering with a 70% or above or being a member of the Irvine CubeSat Program or concurrent enrollment in Math 3 or higher, and teacher recommendation  

Level of Difficulty: CP, D, T

A grade of 60% or higher is required to move to the second semester.

The course of study includes:

· Evolution of Flight · Physics of Flight · Flight Planning and Navigation · Materials and Structures
· Propulsion · Flight Physiology · Space Travel· Orbital Mechanics · Alternative Applications
· Remote Systems · Aerospace Careers · Engineering Ethics

Aerospace Engineering utilizes activity-project-problem-based (APPB) teaching to ignite student learning of the fundamentals of atmospheric and space flight. Aerospace Engineering is one of the specialization courses in the PLTW Engineering program. The course deepens the skills and knowledge of an engineering student within the context of atmospheric and space flight. Students explore the fundamentals of flight in air and space as they bring the concepts to life by designing and testing components related to flight such as an airfoil, propulsion system, and a rocket. They learn orbital mechanics concepts and apply these by creating models using industry-standard software. They also apply aerospace concepts to alternative applications such as a wind turbine and parachute. Students simulate a progression of operations to explore a planet - including creating a map of the terrain with a model satellite and using the map to execute a mission using an autonomous robot.

Upon successful completion of this course (grade 70% or above) students will be eligible to enroll in the capstone course – Engineering Design and Development.  

Any student who needs to repeat this course must repeat the entire year.  


ENGINEERING DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT A/B

Credits: 10
Grade Level: 11-12
Length: One year, alternating
Recommended:  Completion of Aerospace Engineering with a 70% or higher and teacher recommendation  
Level of Difficulty: CP, R, T

A grade of 60% or higher is required to move to the second semester.

The curriculum is aligned to the CA CTE Model Curriculum Standards and Career Ready Standards for the Engineering and Architecture Industry Sector and Engineering Design career pathway.

 The course of study includes:

· Engineering Design Processes ·Project Management · Documenting an Engineering Design Process · Teamwork and Professional Skills · Problem Identification and Justification · Research · Intellectual Property · Design Requirements       · Project Proposals · Design · Virtual Design and Testing · Preliminary Design Reviews · Prototyping · Prototype Testing   · Presenting the Process and Results

Engineering Design and Development (EDD) is the capstone course in the PLTW high school engineering program. It is an open-ended engineering research course in which students work in teams to design and develop an original solution to a well-defined and justified open-ended problem by applying an engineering design process. Students will perform research to select, define, and justify a problem. After carefully defining the design requirements and creating multiple solution approaches, teams of students select an approach, create, and test their solution prototype. Student teams will present and defend their original solution to an outside panel. While progressing through the engineering design process, students will work closely with experts and will continually hone their organizational, communication and interpersonal skills, their creative and problem solving abilities, and their understanding of the design process. Since the projects on which students work can vary with student interest and the curriculum focuses on problem solving, EDD is appropriate for students who are interested in any technical career path.  

Any student who needs to repeat this course must repeat the entire year.  


EXPLORING COMPUTER SCIENCE A/B

Recommended Placement:  Math I or higher with a grade of 80% or above
Credits: 10
Grade Level: 9 -12
Length: One year, alternating
Level of Difficulty: CP

The curriculum is aligned to the CA CTE Model Curriculum Standards and Career Ready Standards for the Sector Information and Communication Technologies and Software & Systems career pathway.

Exploring Computer Science is an introduction to the world of computer science and problem solving. It is a yearlong course consisting of six main units.  Students will study topics like Human Computer Interaction, Problem Solving in a variety of contexts, topics in discrete math including Boolean logic, functions, graphs and the binary number system, Web Design, Programming and Algorithm Development, Computing and Data Analysis, and Robotics as an advanced application of computer science.  This course will help students create a strong foundation to advance to AP Computer Science.


AP COMPUTER SCIENCE A/B

Recommended Placement:  Math III or higher with a grade of 80% or above
Credits: 10
Grade Level: 9 -12
Length: One year, alternating
Level of Difficulty: CP, R

The curriculum is aligned to the CA CTE Model Curriculum Standards and Career Ready Standards for the Sector Information and Communication Technologies and Software & Systems career pathway.

AP Computer Science is a college level course that covers the design, development, testing, and debugging of computer programs using JAVA programming language. The course is designed to serve as a first course in computer science for students with no prior computing experience. Emphasis will be placed on the study of JAVA syntax, object-oriented programming, problem solving, and algorithmic development. This course will prepare students for the College Board’s Advanced Placement Computer Science A examination.

  • Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:
  • Understand the advantages of a compiled language
  • Understand basic program structure, JAVA syntax, and organization
  • Use the classes and methods located in the JAVA library
  • Design programs using object oriented design
  • Write JAVA programs using arrays, array lists, two dimensional arrays, classes and objects
  • Write programs involving recursion
  • Write programs using advanced sorting and searching techniques

BUSINESS EDUCATION INDEPENDENT STUDY

Instructor approval Required
Format: Variable
Credit: Variable    
Entry Fall/Spring semesters
Level of Difficulty: NC, M

Independent Study is designed to allow students to pursue learning goals which interest them, but which are NOT part of the regular course offerings. Prior to registration, the student and his supervising teacher complete a formal agreement using the Request for Independent Study Credit form. The contract will specify the objectives of the activity, the resources required to accomplish the objectives, and a plan for evaluation of the work. Such projects require approval of the supervising teacher, the teacher advisor, department coordinator, parent and principal. The forms are  available from Counselors or department coordinators.


INTRODUCTION TO PHOTO JOURNALISM

(Meets G and F requirements for UC)    
Freshman or sophomore standing ONLY
Credit: 5 units    
Format: 1 semester alt. block
Level of Difficulty: CP

Intro to Photo-Journalism is a 9th/10th grade (one) semester-long alternating block introductory course focusing on visual story-telling through digital photographic means.
The Intro to Photo-Journalism course will assist in preparing students to visually communicate ideas and narratives for entrance into Journalism, Yearbook, Video Production or proceeding Photo courses. The course will stress creative problem solving, logical thinking, accurate and concise journalistic interactions with subject, and original, dynamic, well-composed narrative photography.

  • Students will learn and apply the basic care and functions of a DSLR camera, proper exposure, shutter speed, aperture, and resolution, along with proficient use and application of Adobe Light room and Photoshop.
  • Students will learn and apply the basic elements and principles of designing compositions with specific journalistic concepts of framing, focus/focal point, lighting and actuality emphasized.
  • Students will become aware of and demonstrate the Associated Press code of Photojournalist ethics.
  • Students will research and present a dynamic Prezi on a well-established photo-journalist including analysis of image components that convey and support a story.
  • Students will observe, describe, analyze and evaluate famous historical and contemporary documentary photographs using the New York Times’, “What’s going On in This Picture.”
  • Students will create a portfolio of narrative images to submit for entrance into Journalism, Yearbook, Video Production or proceeding Photo courses.
  • Students will write captions providing details of their photos.
  • Students will become aware and demonstrate appropriate subject interaction, information gathering, locale guidelines, and model releases for publication of information.

Evaluation: Assignments will include written, sequential procedures. Strong and average/below average photo examples will be shown to provide clear visual guidance and tips for avoiding weakness. Rubrics for assignments will correlate specifically to outlined procedures and include a self-evaluation identifying and explaining strengths and weaknesses. In addition, rubrics will include peer critiques.

Assignments:

  1. Shutter Speed: Stop action/fast shutter speed and Blurred motion slow shutter speed
  2. Aperture/DOF: Small f-stop/long DOF and Large f-stop/shallow DOF
  3. Shoot Preparation Exercise: awareness of environment, prefocus, light metering, optimal positioning, subject/event research
  4. POV: unique angle/perspective Low-angle, Eye-level, High Angle, Birds-eye view
  5. Framing: Rule of thirds, Extreme close-up, Close-up, Medium close-up, Medium shot, Medium long shot, Long shot, Wide shot
  6. Lighting: Low-key lighting, High-key lighting, Backlighting, Side lighting
  7. Actuality: Un-posed, spontaneous subjects in natural environment
  8. People: Model release, setting/location, POV, lighting, personality/mood, (un)posed/position
  9. Photo essays: Feature/secondary supporting, Themes: personality/mood, sports/events, people at work, past/present/future, social commentary/protest, sense of place, ritual, travel, community

VISUAL IMAGERY (Photography) F/S

(Meets G and F requirements for UC)    
Credit: 5 units per semester    
Format: 1 semester each; alt. block
Level of Difficulty: CP

The curriculum is aligned to the CA CTE Model Curriculum Standards and Career Ready Standards for the Arts, Media and Entertainment Industry Sector and Design, Visual and Media Arts career pathway.
Visual Imagery explores the fundamentals of photography and creative expression of ideas. Art appreciation is also an integral part of these classes. In Beginning and Intermediate Photographic Arts, students will:

  1. Observe, describe, interpret and evaluate historical and contemporary photographic work.
  2. Explore and produce work displaying comprehension of the elements and principles in designing compositions.
  3. Become keen observers of their environment
  4. Understand basic functions and operations of a manual 35mm camera, and will effectively process their black and white film.
  5. Make good quality black and white enlargements from their negatives.
  6. Understand and utilize printing techniques and procedures such as; dodging and burning, proper chemical procedures, print washing/drying and contrast filters.
  7. Explore a variety of “alternative” procedures including: print toning, hand-coloring, solarizing, multiple exposures, sandwiched negatives, paper negatives and photomontage.
  8. Mount/window mat and display their best photographic work for class, district and countywide exhibitions.
  9. Participate in critiques: observing, describing, interpreting and evaluating fellow student work.
  10. Maintain a daily journal that will address technical issues, art criticism, art history, careers in photography, media related topics and philosophical aesthetics.
  11. Construct and use a pinhole camera
  12. Explore digital photography; learn how to use digital cameras, flatbed & negative/slide scanners, card readers, portable storage devices and photo prints.
  13. Become proficient creating and manipulating original photographs and Adobe PhotoShop software.
  14. Become aware of photography as an art form and a means for expression and effective communication of ideas.

ADVANCED VISUAL IMAGERY (Photography) F/S

Prerequisite: 2 semesters of Visual Imagery and teacher recommendation
Credit: 5 units per semester    
Format: 1 semester each, alt. block
Level of Difficulty: CP
The class may be repeated.

The curriculum is aligned to the CA CTE Model Curriculum Standards and Career Ready Standards for the Arts, Media and Entertainment Industry Sector and Design, Visual and Media Arts career pathway.
Advanced Visual Imagery is a course that guides students through an in-depth exploration of photography as an art form. Students will build on techniques learned in Visual Imagery. Students will explore multiple photographic techniques for personal creative expression of their ideas in order to produce a website portfolio and publish a book. Upon completion of the course, students will:

  1. Demonstrate mastery of basic photography techniques learned in Visual Imagery.
  2. Continue an in-depth exploration of a variety of “alternative” photographic procedures including: paper negatives, bookmaking, 3-D photos, mixed media, pinhole camera, infrared film, woodblock transfers, Hockney collage, Polaroid slide transfers, photomontage, photo narratives, commercial photography, and gifs.
  3. Become proficient using Adobe Photoshop.
  4. Effectively use digital cameras, photo printers, flatbed and negative/slide scanners and an assortment of lenses.
  5. Mat and display their best photographic work for class, district, and countywide exhibitions.
  6. Create a website with their photos and include a written artist statement discussing their creative process.  
  7. Participate in written and oral critiques that will include observation, analysis, interpretation, and evaluation of student photographic work.
  8. Become aware of photography as an important media tool affecting our culture and being instrumental in social change and perception in history.
  9. Become aware of digital media issues as overt or subtle propaganda.
  10. Become aware of photography as an art form and a means for expression and communication of ideas.
  11. Investigate the differing fields in photography such as photojournalism, portraiture, fine art, commercial, and nature
  12. Research careers and education related to photography and design.    
  13. Create a tutorial instructing the class on an innovative photographic technique and process.
  14. Produce a portfolio or self-publish a book consisting of their best photographic work.

Computer Graphics F/S

(Meets G and F requirements for UC)    
Credit: 10 units for the year, 5 units a semester
Level of Difficulty: CP, R
Format: 1 year or 1 semester plus additional Visual Art class for UC credit, or semester alt for elective credit
* Students may enter this course in the Fall or Spring

The curriculum is aligned to the CA CTE Model Curriculum Standards and Career Ready Standards for the Arts, Media and Entertainment Industry Sector and Design, Visual and Media Arts career pathway.
Course Description
This UC approved fine arts elective is designed to introduce a variety of techniques, concepts, and software used to create digital imagery. The class will complete an overview of Adobe Photoshop in fall and Adobe Illustrator in spring.  

Emphasis is placed on the application of elements and principles of design.  

Course Objectives
The student will:

  1. Express original ideas through an understanding of the elements of art and principles of design, as verified by the development and completion of assignments.
  2. Compose pictures which illustrate knowledge of the elements and principles of design, as verified by completion of assignments.
  3. Develop a historical perspective of art and design by recognizing varying individual and cultural themes and styles, as verified by completed assignments.
  4. Develop the ability to make informed aesthetic judgments about works of art, nature, and objects in the total environment, as verified by teacher observation.
  5. Demonstrate understanding and use of vocabulary and terminology associated with computer generated imagery as verified by observation and assignments.
  6. Demonstrate proper uses and care of computers and materials, and equipment as verified by teacher observation.
  7. Participate and display original art work in art shows/contests.
  8. Work safely and appropriately using online using Google apps, and Adobe Creative Suite software.
  9. Demonstrate an understanding of copyright laws as it pertains to art and digital imagery.
  10. Produce a sample design portfolio.

ADVANCED COMPUTER GRAPHICS A/B

(Meets G and F requirements for UC)    
Recommended Placement: A passing grade for both semesters of Computer Graphics and teacher approval.
Credit: 10 units for the year, 5 units per semester
Level of Difficulty: CP, D
Format: Alternating block 1 semester or 1 year

The curriculum is aligned to the CA CTE Model Curriculum Standards and Career Ready Standards for the Arts, Media and Entertainment Industry Sector and Design, Visual and Media Arts career pathway.

Advanced Computer Graphics is an advanced level class. Students will apply their knowledge of art elements and design principles in real work design scenarios. Projects presented will include projects in the fields of: packaging, marketing, brand identity/identity systems, illustration, and entertainment design.


ADVANCED PLACEMENT 2D DESIGN A/B (Photo or Digital Media)

(Meets G and F requirements for UC)        
Recommended Placement: A passing grade for two semesters of Advanced Drawing and Painting, Advanced Photo, or Advanced Computer Graphics.  Teacher approval required.
Credit: 10 units
Level of Difficulty: CP, R
Format: 1 year alt.
Course Description:
This class is an intensive challenge to build a portfolio for submission to the College Board or to create a professional artist website. Students will use the internet to read instructions for a summer assignment and 12 breadth projects and 12 pieces on a theme of their own choosing. Students must be ready to working independently a sustainable amount of time. Students must be capable for asking for help, completing research, taking and applying criticism before entering the class.
The AP Design portfolio can include Drawing, Painting, Photography, Collage and Computer Graphics.

Course Objectives
The student will:

  1. Use the internet to read instructions for the summer assignment and 12 breadth projects.
  2. Express original ideas through an understanding of the elements of art and principles of design, as verified by the development and completion of assignments.
  3. Use advance skills necessary to work independently with a variety of art media in the development and completion of two dimensional art projects. Additional emphasis will be on good craftsmanship, as verified by completed projects.
  4. Develop a historical perspective in art by recognizing varying individual and cultural themes and styles, as verified by completed assignments.
  5. Develop the ability to make informed aesthetic judgments about works of art, nature, and objects in the total environment, as verified by teacher observation.
  6. Demonstrate understanding and use of vocabulary and terminology associated with art as verified by observation, assignments and tests.
  7. Read instructional materials online related to art assignments, write, and make simple mathematical computations necessary in assigned activities, as verified by projects.
  8. Participate and display original art work in the school art show.
  9. Submit a portfolio to the College Board or create an artist website.
  10. Photograph artwork, edit, and upload artwork in the appropriate format to the AP Collegeboard or a personal website.
  11. Demonstrate an understanding of copyright laws as it pertains to art and digital imagery.
  12. Work safely and appropriately using Edmodo, Aeries, and other websites.

ANIMATION A/B

Credit: 10
Format: 1 year alt. block
Level of Difficulty: CP

Animation exposes students to a range of traditional and digital techniques used in stop-motion, Claymation, and 2-D computer animation.  Projects are designed for students to develop skills in drawing, sculpting, writing, storyboarding, layout, and character design.  This course explores the history of animation, foundations of art, design, and animation, vector and raster computer imaging, basic photography, creative storytelling, contemporary animation trends, techniques, personal voice, and working in teams.  Projects will include, but are not limited to, frame-by-frame animation, digital, and analog cut out animation, stop motion animation, and hybrid styles.


AP ART HISTORY A/B

Recommended junior standing and recommended completion of AP European History, OR instructor’s approval, OR sophomore standing with H World Studies instructor’s approval.
Credit: 10
Format: 1 yr. Alt. block
Level of Difficulty: CP, R
73% or better in 1st semester to continue onto AP Art History B

AP Art History is a survey course that introduces students to discover the diversity in and connections among forms of artistic expression throughout history and from around the globe. Students learn about how people have responded to and communicated their experiences through art making by exploring art in its historic and cultural contexts. The AP Art History has a specified number of works of art students are required to understand in order to support their in-depth learning, critical analysis skills, and discovery of connections among global artistic traditions. The AP Art History course welcomes students into the global art world as active participants, engaging with its forms and content as they research, discuss, read, and write about art, artists, art making, and responses to and interpretations of art. This class requires a high
degree of commitment to academic work. As students study works of art in the image set, they apply the essential art historical skills within the learning objectives, such as visual, contextual, and comparative analysis.
The curriculum and content of the course are based on three sets of big ideas and essential questions intended to encourage investigation of art throughout time and place and to foster students’ understanding of the discipline of art history.
Big idea 1: Artists manipulate materials and ideas to create an aesthetic object, act, or event.
Essential Question: What is art and how is it made?
Big idea 2: Art making is shaped by tradition and change.
Essential Question: Why and how does art change?
Big idea 3: Interpretations of art are variable.
Essential Question: How do we describe our thinking about art?
Students will also make connections with other subject areas such as Literature, Music, History, Mythology, Religion, and Sciences and the concurrent art and/or architecture produced during a particular period. Students will be prepared to take the College Board’s Advanced Placement test for college credit in May.


ART—INDEPENDENT STUDY

Recommended Placement: Approval of Art Dept. Chair Required
Credit: Variable     
Format: Variable
Level of Difficulty: NC    

Independent Study is designed to allow students to pursue learning goals which interest them, but which are NOT part of the regular course offerings. Prior to registration, the student and his supervising teacher complete a formal agreement using the Request for Independent Study Credit form. The contract will specify the objectives of the activity, the resources required to accomplish the objectives, and a plan for evaluation of the work. Such projects require approval of the supervising teacher, the teacher advisor, department coordinator, parent and principal. The forms are  available from Counselors or Department coordinators.


YEARBOOK A/B

Recommended Placement: Yearbook Advisor Approval
Credit: 10     
Level of Difficulty: NC, D    
Format: 1 year alt. block
This is a practical course designed to develop skills in media publication.  During the first semester of this course, students will learn how to develop a theme, conduct interviews, write stories and headlines, design yearbook pages using an online publishing program, and take and crop digital photographs using Photoshop and other software.  Following semesters will incorporate the development and mastery of these skills in addition to the development of leadership, editing and business management skills.  Students must apply to the program during the spring of the previous year and are selected for this class on the basis of interest, maturity, and existing level of skill in writing and photography.  
Upon completion of this course, students will:

  1. Demonstrate knowledge and skill in publication design and garner a clear understanding of the process
  2. Develop and implement a cohesive theme for the book
  3. Work both individually and collaboratively to document the school year both visually and in writing
  4. Analyze and study current design trends used in professional publications
  5. Use a photojournalistic style of photography to document the year’s events
  6. Conduct interviews as a means of developing stories and gaining coverage
  7. Write headlines, stories, and captions
  8. Develop leadership and business management skills
  9. Gain historical awareness of print media and an understanding of its role in society

VIDEO PRODUCTION F/S

(Meets G and F requirements for UC)    
Credit: 5-10
Format: 1 semester alt. block.
Level of Difficulty: CP, M
*Students may begin course in Fall or Spring

The curriculum is aligned to the CA CTE Model Curriculum Standards and Career Ready Standards for the Arts, Media and Entertainment Industry Sector – Digital Visual Media or Production Management and Design, Visual, Media Arts career pathway.

This UC approved fine arts elective is designed to introduce a variety of techniques, concepts, and software used to create video projects. The class will complete an overview of the editing software, Adobe Premier.  Emphasis is placed on the application of elements and principles of design.  

Objectives
Students will:

  1. Learn/practice jobs within the three stages of the video production process, pre-production, production, and post-production
  2. Learn production roles including storytelling, script writing, storyboarding, camera operation, directing, producing, and editing
  3. Develop competency in managing time and people
  4. Explore and refine their conceptual and aesthetic styles, as well as practical and technical skills
  5. Be able to use digital editing and multiple video elements together (images, sound, interviews, music, footage) to convey a message, tell a story, and achieve communication goals

ART OF FILM

Recommended Placement: Two Semesters of Video Production and/or teacher recommendation
Credit: 5-10
Format: 1 semester alt. block.
Level of Difficulty: CP, M
*Students may begin course in Fall or Spring

The curriculum is aligned to the CA CTE Model Curriculum Standards and Career Ready Standards for the Arts, Media and Entertainment Industry Sector – Digital Visual Media or Production Management and Design, Visual, Media Arts career pathway.

This yearlong course is both visual arts and CTE. Open to Advanced Video Students and other video students upon teacher recommendation. This class focuses on the art of making films. Students will have the opportunity to explore production techniques for personal creative expression of their ideas. This is both a presentation and a project-based course. Students may take this course concurrently with Video Productions.


ADVANCED VIDEO PRODUCTION/iTV A/B

Recommended Placement: Completion of two semesters of Video productions or teacher recommendation and application submission and students are required to attend the FilmEd summer workshop.
Credit: 10
Format: 2 semesters alt. block (This class may be repeated)
Level of Difficulty: CP, M

The curriculum is aligned to the CA CTE Model Curriculum Standards and Career Ready Standards for the Arts, Media and Entertainment Industry Sector – Digital Visual Media or Production Management and Design, Visual, Media Arts career pathway.
This UC approved fine arts elective is designed to prepare students for the film industry.  This yearlong course include: creating bi-monthly broadcasts, filming/mixing live events including all pep rallies, participation in film festivals such as the Orange County Film Festival, participation in video contests, creating the yearbook DVD, creating independent projects, and much more!

Objectives
Students will:

  1. Practice jobs within the three stages of the video production process, pre-production, production, and post-production
  2. Discover their particular interests and abilities within the film industry
  3. Become proficient in production roles including storytelling, script writing, storyboarding, camera operation, directing, producing, and editing
  4. Explore and refine their conceptual and aesthetic styles, as well as practical and technical skills
  5. Be able to convey a message, tell a story, and achieve communication goals

Non-Departmental Classes

HEALTH

Credit: 5          

Format: 1 semester alt. block

Level of Difficulty: NC, required course

 

This course emphasizes current individual and community health issues. The physical, mental, social and emotional aspects of health problems are discussed. The first-aid portion of this course emphasizes safety procedures and basic first-aid techniques. Upon completion, the student will be able to:

 

1. Identify major communicable diseases.

2. Identify available health services in the community.

3. List the effects of hazardous substance abuse on the individual and the society.

4. Understand life-saving techniques, including mouth-to-mouth resuscitation, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), the abdominal thrust maneuver (choking), and other appropriate emergency techniques for burns, bleeding, broken bones, poisoning and shock.

5. Explain the function of various parts of the human reproductive system.

6. Identify the symptoms and causes for various STD’s.


§ LEADERSHIP A/B

This class is for elected Student Body officers only

Credit: 10 units

Format: 1 year alt. block           

Level of Difficulty: NC, M       

 

Upon completion of the course, the student will be able to:

  1. Identify major leadership principles
  2. Describe how a leader participates in the democratic process
  3. Know and be able to work within parliamentary procedural guidelines
  4. Learn through experience program planning (long and short-range). Plan for and carry out elections
  5. Understand financial procedures and responsibilities as they pertain to the school ASB budget
  6. Demonstrate and practice the communication, trust, and interpersonal skills necessary to be an asset to a team.
  7. Develop intra-school relationships.
  8. Utilize successful publicity techniques.
  9. Evaluate events.

§ = Students will be expected to spend additional hours beyond the regular class time.


STUDENT ASSISTANT

Recommended Placement: Approval of instructor, Sophomore Standing

Credit: 5 -10 (variable) 

Format: 1 semester alt. block

Level of Difficulty: NC

 

A Student Assistant performs clerical or other routine services for a given office or staff member. Student Assistants may work in school offices, the media center, lab, shop, or for a given teacher. In each case, students are selected by members of the Irvine High School staff. Students earning credit for Student Assistant are required to sign a contract specifying the nature of the activities and the time committed. In general, .5 credits are awarded for 9 hours of work and the satisfactory completion of the assigned duties and responsibilities.

 

No more than 10 credits may be counted toward graduation. No more than 20 credits of Community Work Experience and Student Assistant combined are allowed toward graduation requirements.

*Freshmen cannot be Student Assistants.

*Students enrolled in student assisting must report to the upstairs office until they have an assigned teacher. Failure to do so will result in being reported as truant and having detentions assigned.


PEER TUTOR

Recommended Placement: GPA of 3.3 or greater, Approval of assistant principal, Sophomore standing or higher

Credit: 5 - 10 (variable)

Format: 1 semester alt. block

Level of Difficulty: NC

 

A Peer Tutor works with peers on homework, study skills, and preparing for assessments under the supervision of a certificated teacher. There is a requirement of a short training at the beginning of the peer tutoring experience. 


DIRECTED STUDIES

Approval of Instructor

Credit: 1 - 5 (variable)

Format: 1 year alt. block

Level of Difficulty: NC

 

This class is for identified Special Education students. It is designed to assist these students with their mainstreamed classes. Strategies provided include test taking, study skills, organizational skills, and computerized academic remediation.


ESSENTIAL LIFE SKILLS A/B

Approval of Instructor 

Credit: 5          

Format: 1 semester each, alt. block

Level of Difficulty: NC

 

This course is for identified Special Education students. It is designed to provide students with the skills necessary to become independent and have personal and vocational success. Topics include personal interests, self-advocacy skills, health and safety, interviewing skills, keeping a job, interpersonal relationships, time management, money management, and community resource exploration. Upon completion of the course, students will have an individualized portfolio including a completed job application, resume, and writing a cover letter.


STUDY SKILLS A/B

Credit: 5 (variable)

Format: 1 semester alt. block

Level of Difficulty: NC

 

Study Skills is a course designed for those who have struggled in school in the past. The course provides students with ample time to work on assignments while simultaneously providing those students with the support they need to improve their academic performance. That support includes a rigid structure, instruction on good student practices and opportunities to receive one on one assistance with assignments. Student progress is monitored closely during the course in order to tailor each student’s experience to their academic needs. The good student practices that are covered in this class are as follows.

  1. Time Organization
  2. General Organization
  3. Test taking
  4. Note taking
  5. Memory techniques

ACADEMIC SEMINAR A/B

Credit: 5 (variable)

Format: 1 semester alternating block

Level of Difficulty: NC

Academic Seminar is an invitation-only course designed to provide support for 10th-12th graders enrolled in an Honors or AP level course for the first time. Students are given time to work on assignments for those courses, and receive assistance when requested. Students also receive support in developing various skills, including organization, time management, note-taking strategies, annotation of primary and secondary source documents, test-taking skills geared primarily to AP exams, listening skills & developing resilience in meeting the requirements of Honors/AP level courses.


 § COMMUNITY WORK EXPERIENCE

Must have pre-approval by Community Work Experience Coordinator

Credit: 1 credit per 40 hours (variable)   

Format: Variable

Open Entry/Exit (on approval of coordinator)

 

Community Work Experience is a program that develops skills, habits and attitudes conducive to job success, personal growth, and to help students prepare realistically and wisely for a career. Students enrolled in Community Work Experience who are under the age of 18 MUST APPLY FOR A WORK PERMIT (Work Permit applications are available in the upstairs office). Students with a Work Permit will have the following employment restrictions:

  1. The maximum allowable work hours are 28 hours per week and no more than 4 hrs/day on school nights.
  2. Students cannot work after 10:00 p.m. on school nights or after 12:30 p.m. on other nights.
  3. Students may not work 7 consecutive days.
  4. Students may not work more than 8 hours/day.

Students in Community Work Experience must maintain their job and notify coordinator if there is a change in status.

The maximum number of allowable credits is 5 per semester. No more than 20 credits of Community Work Experience and Student Assistant combined are allowed toward graduation requirements.

Students must maintain a 2.0 GPA and have no more than 3 detentions outstanding to remain in the Work Experience Program.

All required forms, time cards, and related instruction must be completed on time.